Blood pressure (BP) is characterized by marked short-term fluctuations occurring within a 24 h period (beat-to-beat, minute-to-minute, hour-to-hour, and day-to-night changes) and also by long-term fluctuations occurring over more-prolonged periods of time (days, weeks, months, seasons, and even years). Rather than representing ‘background noise’ or a randomly occurring phenomenon, these variations have been shown to be the result of complex interactions between extrinsic environmental and behavioural factors and intrinsic cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. Although the adverse cardiovascular consequences of hypertension largely depend on absolute BP values, evidence from observational studies and post-hoc analyses of data from clinical trials have indicated that these outcomes might also depend on increased BP variability (BPV). Increased short-term and long-term BPV are associated with the development, progression, and severity of cardiac, vascular, and renal damage and with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. Of particular interest are the findings from post-hoc analyses of large intervention trials in hypertension, showing that within-patient visit-to-visit BPV is strongly prognostic for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This result has prompted discussion on whether antihypertensive treatment should be targeted not only towards reducing mean BP levels but also to stabilizing BPV with the aim of achieving consistent BP control over time, which might favour cardiovascular protection.

Parati, G., OCHOA MUNERA, J., Lombardi, C., & Bilo, G. (2013). Assessment and management of blood pressure variability. NATURE REVIEWS. CARDIOLOGY, 10, 143-155 [10.1038/nrcardio.2013.1].

Assessment and management of blood pressure variability.

PARATI, GIANFRANCO;OCHOA MUNERA, JUAN EUGENIO;LOMBARDI, CAROLINA;BILO, GRZEGORZ
2013

Abstract

Blood pressure (BP) is characterized by marked short-term fluctuations occurring within a 24 h period (beat-to-beat, minute-to-minute, hour-to-hour, and day-to-night changes) and also by long-term fluctuations occurring over more-prolonged periods of time (days, weeks, months, seasons, and even years). Rather than representing ‘background noise’ or a randomly occurring phenomenon, these variations have been shown to be the result of complex interactions between extrinsic environmental and behavioural factors and intrinsic cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. Although the adverse cardiovascular consequences of hypertension largely depend on absolute BP values, evidence from observational studies and post-hoc analyses of data from clinical trials have indicated that these outcomes might also depend on increased BP variability (BPV). Increased short-term and long-term BPV are associated with the development, progression, and severity of cardiac, vascular, and renal damage and with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. Of particular interest are the findings from post-hoc analyses of large intervention trials in hypertension, showing that within-patient visit-to-visit BPV is strongly prognostic for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This result has prompted discussion on whether antihypertensive treatment should be targeted not only towards reducing mean BP levels but also to stabilizing BPV with the aim of achieving consistent BP control over time, which might favour cardiovascular protection.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
blood pressure variability
English
Parati, G., OCHOA MUNERA, J., Lombardi, C., & Bilo, G. (2013). Assessment and management of blood pressure variability. NATURE REVIEWS. CARDIOLOGY, 10, 143-155 [10.1038/nrcardio.2013.1].
Parati, G; OCHOA MUNERA, J; Lombardi, C; Bilo, G
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Assessment-Nature Reviews Cardiology 2013.pdf

Solo gestori archivio

Dimensione 380.2 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
380.2 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/42010
Citazioni
  • Scopus 476
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 469
Social impact