Background: Patients with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders (SSD) demonstrate poor social functioning. While group-based approaches show long-term improvements, access to treatments is limited. Digital platforms hold promise to overcome barriers to treatment delivery and improve outcomes. Objective: In a parallel arm, double-blind RCT, we tested CLIMB, a clinician-assisted, adjunct to treatment that includes computerized social cognition training (SCT), ecological momentary assessments (EMAs), group tele-therapy, and moderated messaging. CLIMB was compared to an active control that includes computerized general cognitive training (GCT), unstructured support groups, and unmoderated messaging. Methods: The primary outcome was social functioning. Secondary outcomes were negative symptoms and quality of life (QoL). Given the sample size, Propensity Score Models were used to ensure balanced baseline covariates. Mixed-effects models examined change over time. Results: 24 participants completed the study (12 per arm). No significant between-group differences emerged in engagement. CLIMB participants engaged in a median of 8 sessions (IQR = 2), 2.8 h of SCT (IQR = 7.5), and 2710 EMAs; control participants engaged in a median of 9 sessions (IQR = 3) and 2.2 h of GCT (IQR = 7.9). As a group, participants showed significant improvements in social functioning (p = .046), with no between-group differences. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated greater improvements in QoL (p = .025) for the active control. Conclusions: Delivering group-based mobile interventions to individuals with SSD is feasible. EMAs allow clinicians to maintain inter-session engagement, build participant self-awareness, and tailor treatment delivery. In this treatment model, whether SCT or GCT is more effective remains unclear. Further research will evaluate group-based mobile interventions to improve outcomes in SSD.

Dabit, S., Quraishi, S., Jordan, J., Biagianti, B. (2021). Improving social functioning in people with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders via mobile experimental interventions: Results from the CLIMB pilot trial. SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH: COGNITION, 26 [10.1016/j.scog.2021.100211].

Improving social functioning in people with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders via mobile experimental interventions: Results from the CLIMB pilot trial

Biagianti B
2021

Abstract

Background: Patients with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders (SSD) demonstrate poor social functioning. While group-based approaches show long-term improvements, access to treatments is limited. Digital platforms hold promise to overcome barriers to treatment delivery and improve outcomes. Objective: In a parallel arm, double-blind RCT, we tested CLIMB, a clinician-assisted, adjunct to treatment that includes computerized social cognition training (SCT), ecological momentary assessments (EMAs), group tele-therapy, and moderated messaging. CLIMB was compared to an active control that includes computerized general cognitive training (GCT), unstructured support groups, and unmoderated messaging. Methods: The primary outcome was social functioning. Secondary outcomes were negative symptoms and quality of life (QoL). Given the sample size, Propensity Score Models were used to ensure balanced baseline covariates. Mixed-effects models examined change over time. Results: 24 participants completed the study (12 per arm). No significant between-group differences emerged in engagement. CLIMB participants engaged in a median of 8 sessions (IQR = 2), 2.8 h of SCT (IQR = 7.5), and 2710 EMAs; control participants engaged in a median of 9 sessions (IQR = 3) and 2.2 h of GCT (IQR = 7.9). As a group, participants showed significant improvements in social functioning (p = .046), with no between-group differences. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated greater improvements in QoL (p = .025) for the active control. Conclusions: Delivering group-based mobile interventions to individuals with SSD is feasible. EMAs allow clinicians to maintain inter-session engagement, build participant self-awareness, and tailor treatment delivery. In this treatment model, whether SCT or GCT is more effective remains unclear. Further research will evaluate group-based mobile interventions to improve outcomes in SSD.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Cognitive training, mobile health; Psychosis; Social cognition;
English
2021
26
100211
open
Dabit, S., Quraishi, S., Jordan, J., Biagianti, B. (2021). Improving social functioning in people with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders via mobile experimental interventions: Results from the CLIMB pilot trial. SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH: COGNITION, 26 [10.1016/j.scog.2021.100211].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/407406
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