In recent decades, the automatic recognition and interpretation of brain waves acquired by electroencephalographic (EEG) technologies have undergone remarkable growth, leading to a consequent rapid development of brain–computer interfaces (BCIs). EEG-based BCIs are non-invasive systems that allow communication between a human being and an external device interpreting brain activity directly. Thanks to the advances in neurotechnologies, and especially in the field of wearable devices, BCIs are now also employed outside medical and clinical applications. Within this context, this paper proposes a systematic review of EEG-based BCIs, focusing on one of the most promising paradigms based on motor imagery (MI) and limiting the analysis to applications that adopt wearable devices. This review aims to evaluate the maturity levels of these systems, both from the technological and computational points of view. The selection of papers has been performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), leading to 84 publications considered in the last ten years (from 2012 to 2022). Besides technological and computational aspects, this review also aims to systematically list experimental paradigms and available datasets in order to identify benchmarks and guidelines for the development of new applications and computational models.

Saibene, A., Caglioni, M., Corchs, S., Gasparini, F. (2023). EEG-Based BCIs on Motor Imagery Paradigm Using Wearable Technologies: A Systematic Review. SENSORS, 23(5), 1-42 [10.3390/s23052798].

EEG-Based BCIs on Motor Imagery Paradigm Using Wearable Technologies: A Systematic Review

Saibene A.
Primo
;
Caglioni M.
Secondo
;
Corchs S.
Penultimo
;
Gasparini F.
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

In recent decades, the automatic recognition and interpretation of brain waves acquired by electroencephalographic (EEG) technologies have undergone remarkable growth, leading to a consequent rapid development of brain–computer interfaces (BCIs). EEG-based BCIs are non-invasive systems that allow communication between a human being and an external device interpreting brain activity directly. Thanks to the advances in neurotechnologies, and especially in the field of wearable devices, BCIs are now also employed outside medical and clinical applications. Within this context, this paper proposes a systematic review of EEG-based BCIs, focusing on one of the most promising paradigms based on motor imagery (MI) and limiting the analysis to applications that adopt wearable devices. This review aims to evaluate the maturity levels of these systems, both from the technological and computational points of view. The selection of papers has been performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), leading to 84 publications considered in the last ten years (from 2012 to 2022). Besides technological and computational aspects, this review also aims to systematically list experimental paradigms and available datasets in order to identify benchmarks and guidelines for the development of new applications and computational models.
Articolo in rivista - Review Essay
brain–computer interface (BCI); electroencephalogram (EEG); motor imagery (MI); wearable devices;
English
3-mar-2023
2023
23
5
1
42
2798
open
Saibene, A., Caglioni, M., Corchs, S., Gasparini, F. (2023). EEG-Based BCIs on Motor Imagery Paradigm Using Wearable Technologies: A Systematic Review. SENSORS, 23(5), 1-42 [10.3390/s23052798].
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Saibene-2023-Sensors-VoR.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Review
Tipologia di allegato: Publisher’s Version (Version of Record, VoR)
Licenza: Creative Commons
Dimensione 1.01 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.01 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/406675
Citazioni
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
Social impact