Purpose: Gastrointestinal symptoms are often related to antibiotic treatment. Their incidence, risk and protective conditions in children are not well defined and represent the aims of this study. Methods: We prospectively enrolled inpatient children submitted to antibiotic treatment. Indication, type, dose and duration of treatment, probiotic supplementation and gastrointestinal symptoms were recorded at recruitment, after two and four weeks. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) was defined as the presence of at least 3 loose/liquid stools within 14 days from antibiotic onset. Results: AAD occurred in 59/289 (20.4%) of patients, with increased risk in children younger than 3 years (relative risk [RR]=4.25), in lower respiratory (RR=2.11) and urinary infections (RR=3.67), intravenous administration (RR=1.81) and previous AAD episodes (RR=1.87). Abdominal pain occurred in 27/289 (9.3%), particularly in children >6 years (RR=4.15), with previous abdominal pain (RR=7.2) or constipation (RR=4.06). Constipation was recorded in 23/289 (8.0%), with increased risk in children having surgery (RR=2.56) or previous constipation (RR=7.38). Probiotic supplementation significantly reduced AAD (RR=0.30) and abdominal pain (RR=0.36). Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and L. reuteri significantly reduced AAD (RR=0.37 and 0.35) and abdominal pain (RR=0.37 and 0.24). Conclusion: AAD occurred in 20.4% of children, with increased risk at younger age, lower respiratory and urinary tract infections, intravenous treatment and previous AAD. LGG and L. reuteri reduced both AAD and associated abdominal pain.

Baù, M., Moretti, A., Bertoni, E., Vazzoler, V., Luini, C., Agosti, M., et al. (2020). Risk and Protective Factors for Gastrointestinal Symptoms associated with Antibiotic Treatment in Children: A Population Study. PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY, HEPATOLOGY & NUTRITION, 23(1), 35-48 [10.5223/pghn.2020.23.1.35].

Risk and Protective Factors for Gastrointestinal Symptoms associated with Antibiotic Treatment in Children: A Population Study

Moretti, Alex;
2020

Abstract

Purpose: Gastrointestinal symptoms are often related to antibiotic treatment. Their incidence, risk and protective conditions in children are not well defined and represent the aims of this study. Methods: We prospectively enrolled inpatient children submitted to antibiotic treatment. Indication, type, dose and duration of treatment, probiotic supplementation and gastrointestinal symptoms were recorded at recruitment, after two and four weeks. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) was defined as the presence of at least 3 loose/liquid stools within 14 days from antibiotic onset. Results: AAD occurred in 59/289 (20.4%) of patients, with increased risk in children younger than 3 years (relative risk [RR]=4.25), in lower respiratory (RR=2.11) and urinary infections (RR=3.67), intravenous administration (RR=1.81) and previous AAD episodes (RR=1.87). Abdominal pain occurred in 27/289 (9.3%), particularly in children >6 years (RR=4.15), with previous abdominal pain (RR=7.2) or constipation (RR=4.06). Constipation was recorded in 23/289 (8.0%), with increased risk in children having surgery (RR=2.56) or previous constipation (RR=7.38). Probiotic supplementation significantly reduced AAD (RR=0.30) and abdominal pain (RR=0.36). Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and L. reuteri significantly reduced AAD (RR=0.37 and 0.35) and abdominal pain (RR=0.37 and 0.24). Conclusion: AAD occurred in 20.4% of children, with increased risk at younger age, lower respiratory and urinary tract infections, intravenous treatment and previous AAD. LGG and L. reuteri reduced both AAD and associated abdominal pain.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Abdominal pain; Anti-bacterial agents; Antibiotic-associated diarrhea; Children; Constipation; Diarrhea; Lactobacillus reuteri; Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG; Probiotics;
English
2020
23
1
35
48
open
Baù, M., Moretti, A., Bertoni, E., Vazzoler, V., Luini, C., Agosti, M., et al. (2020). Risk and Protective Factors for Gastrointestinal Symptoms associated with Antibiotic Treatment in Children: A Population Study. PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY, HEPATOLOGY & NUTRITION, 23(1), 35-48 [10.5223/pghn.2020.23.1.35].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/406096
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