According to embodied cognition research, one’s bodily self-perception can be illusory and temporarily shifted toward an external body. Similarly, the so-called “enfacement illusion” induced with a synchronous multisensory stimulation over the self-face and an external face can result in implicit and explicit changes in the bodily self. The present study aimed to verify (i) the possibility of eliciting an enfacement illusion over computer-generated faces and (ii) which multisensory stimulation condition was more effective. A total of 23 participants were asked to look at a gender-matched avatar in three synchronous experimental conditions and three asynchronous control conditions (one for each stimulation: visuotactile, visuomotor, and simple exposure). After each condition, participants were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing both the embodiment and the enfacement sensations to address different facets of the illusion. Results suggest a stronger effect of synchronous vs. asynchronous stimulation, and the difference was more pronounced for the embodiment items of the questionnaire. We also found a greater effect of visuotactile and visuomotor stimulations as compared to the simple exposure condition. These findings support the enfacement illusion as a new paradigm to investigate the ownership of different face identities and the specific role of visuotactile and visuomotor stimulations with virtual reality stimuli.

La Rocca, S., Gobbo, S., Tosi, G., Fiora, E., Daini, R. (2023). Look at me now! Enfacement illusion over computer-generated faces. FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, 17 [10.3389/fnhum.2023.1026196].

Look at me now! Enfacement illusion over computer-generated faces

La Rocca, S
;
Gobbo, S;Tosi, G;Daini, R
2023

Abstract

According to embodied cognition research, one’s bodily self-perception can be illusory and temporarily shifted toward an external body. Similarly, the so-called “enfacement illusion” induced with a synchronous multisensory stimulation over the self-face and an external face can result in implicit and explicit changes in the bodily self. The present study aimed to verify (i) the possibility of eliciting an enfacement illusion over computer-generated faces and (ii) which multisensory stimulation condition was more effective. A total of 23 participants were asked to look at a gender-matched avatar in three synchronous experimental conditions and three asynchronous control conditions (one for each stimulation: visuotactile, visuomotor, and simple exposure). After each condition, participants were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing both the embodiment and the enfacement sensations to address different facets of the illusion. Results suggest a stronger effect of synchronous vs. asynchronous stimulation, and the difference was more pronounced for the embodiment items of the questionnaire. We also found a greater effect of visuotactile and visuomotor stimulations as compared to the simple exposure condition. These findings support the enfacement illusion as a new paradigm to investigate the ownership of different face identities and the specific role of visuotactile and visuomotor stimulations with virtual reality stimuli.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
computer-generated faces; embodiment; enfacement; face processing; visual perception;
English
2023
17
1026196
none
La Rocca, S., Gobbo, S., Tosi, G., Fiora, E., Daini, R. (2023). Look at me now! Enfacement illusion over computer-generated faces. FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, 17 [10.3389/fnhum.2023.1026196].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/405493
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