Background: Low back pain (LBP) is associated with altered postural control, mostly observed at later stages in the LBP trajectory. It is unclear whether postural control differs in the acute phase of LBP. Research question: Is postural control different in the acute phase of LBP (<2 weeks) and do differences depend on pain intensity, psychological features and/or availability of vision to control posture? Methods: Cross-sectional study design. An unstable sitting paradigm (to reduce the contribution of the legs) assessed postural control of participants with acute LBP (n = 133) and pain-free controls (n = 74). Centre of pressure (CoP) reflected seat movements. Participants balanced with eyes closed, open, or with visual feedback of the anteroposterior CoP position. Balance performance was expressed by CoP displacement and velocity, and stabilogram diffusion analysis. Generalised estimating equations (GEEs) including body mass index, sex, and safety bar touch, tested differences between groups and between balance conditions. Separate GEEs were used to model performance measures and bar touch (yes/no) including pain intensity, disability and psychological features. Results: CoP displacement and critical point coordinates (time and distance where CoP diffusion rate or spread slows) were larger in LBP than pain-free controls independent of balance condition. Long-term diffusion rate was greater in LBP than controls with eyes closed. CoP velocity measures (RMS, short term diffusion rate) were not different between groups. Pain intensity and psychological features were not linearly related to balance performance in participants with acute LBP. Higher pain catastrophizing was associated with touching the safety bar. Significance: Postural control differs in acute LBP than pain-free controls. Findings might be explained by altered sensory processing, lesser ability to reweight proprioceptive information and/or less accurate trunk muscle control. Although not linearly related to pain-intensity or psychological features in the acute stage, reduced balance performance could potentially have impact on LBP recovery.

van den Hoorn, W., Meroni, R., Klyne, D., Alshehri, M., Hodges, P. (2022). Balance control in unstable sitting in individuals with an acute episode of low back pain. GAIT & POSTURE, 95(June 2022), 15-21 [10.1016/j.gaitpost.2022.03.014].

Balance control in unstable sitting in individuals with an acute episode of low back pain

Meroni R.;
2022

Abstract

Background: Low back pain (LBP) is associated with altered postural control, mostly observed at later stages in the LBP trajectory. It is unclear whether postural control differs in the acute phase of LBP. Research question: Is postural control different in the acute phase of LBP (<2 weeks) and do differences depend on pain intensity, psychological features and/or availability of vision to control posture? Methods: Cross-sectional study design. An unstable sitting paradigm (to reduce the contribution of the legs) assessed postural control of participants with acute LBP (n = 133) and pain-free controls (n = 74). Centre of pressure (CoP) reflected seat movements. Participants balanced with eyes closed, open, or with visual feedback of the anteroposterior CoP position. Balance performance was expressed by CoP displacement and velocity, and stabilogram diffusion analysis. Generalised estimating equations (GEEs) including body mass index, sex, and safety bar touch, tested differences between groups and between balance conditions. Separate GEEs were used to model performance measures and bar touch (yes/no) including pain intensity, disability and psychological features. Results: CoP displacement and critical point coordinates (time and distance where CoP diffusion rate or spread slows) were larger in LBP than pain-free controls independent of balance condition. Long-term diffusion rate was greater in LBP than controls with eyes closed. CoP velocity measures (RMS, short term diffusion rate) were not different between groups. Pain intensity and psychological features were not linearly related to balance performance in participants with acute LBP. Higher pain catastrophizing was associated with touching the safety bar. Significance: Postural control differs in acute LBP than pain-free controls. Findings might be explained by altered sensory processing, lesser ability to reweight proprioceptive information and/or less accurate trunk muscle control. Although not linearly related to pain-intensity or psychological features in the acute stage, reduced balance performance could potentially have impact on LBP recovery.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Centre of pressure; Low back pain; Postural control; Stabilogram diffusion analysis; Unstable sitting;
English
24-mar-2022
2022
95
June 2022
15
21
none
van den Hoorn, W., Meroni, R., Klyne, D., Alshehri, M., Hodges, P. (2022). Balance control in unstable sitting in individuals with an acute episode of low back pain. GAIT & POSTURE, 95(June 2022), 15-21 [10.1016/j.gaitpost.2022.03.014].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/404698
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