Microplastics are now polluting all seas and, while studies have found numerous negative interactions between plastic pollution and marine animals, the effects on embryonic development are poorly understood. A potentially important source of developmental ecotoxicity comes from chemicals leached from plastic particles to the marine environment. Here we investigate the effects of leachates from new and beach-collected pellets on the embryonic and larval development of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and demonstrate that exposure of developing embryos to these leachates elicits severe, consistent and treatment-specific developmental abnormalities including radialisation of the embryo and malformation of the skeleton, neural and immune cells. Using a multi-omics approach we define the developmental pathways disturbed upon exposure to PVC leachates and provide a mechanistic view that pinpoints cellular redox stress and energy production as drivers of phenotypic abnormalities following exposure to PVC leachates. Analysis of leachates identified high concentrations of zinc that are the likely cause of these observed defects. Our findings point to clear and specific detrimental effects of marine plastic pollution on the development of echinoderms, demonstrating that chemicals leached from plastic particles into sea water can produce strong developmental abnormalities via specific pathways, and therefore have the potential to impact on a wide range of organisms.

Paganos, P., Ullmann, C., Gaglio, D., Bonanomi, M., Salmistraro, N., Arnone, M., et al. (2023). Plastic leachate-induced toxicity during sea urchin embryonic development: Insights into the molecular pathways affected by PVC. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 864(15 March 2023) [10.1016/j.scitotenv.2022.160901].

Plastic leachate-induced toxicity during sea urchin embryonic development: Insights into the molecular pathways affected by PVC

Bonanomi, Marcella
;
2023

Abstract

Microplastics are now polluting all seas and, while studies have found numerous negative interactions between plastic pollution and marine animals, the effects on embryonic development are poorly understood. A potentially important source of developmental ecotoxicity comes from chemicals leached from plastic particles to the marine environment. Here we investigate the effects of leachates from new and beach-collected pellets on the embryonic and larval development of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and demonstrate that exposure of developing embryos to these leachates elicits severe, consistent and treatment-specific developmental abnormalities including radialisation of the embryo and malformation of the skeleton, neural and immune cells. Using a multi-omics approach we define the developmental pathways disturbed upon exposure to PVC leachates and provide a mechanistic view that pinpoints cellular redox stress and energy production as drivers of phenotypic abnormalities following exposure to PVC leachates. Analysis of leachates identified high concentrations of zinc that are the likely cause of these observed defects. Our findings point to clear and specific detrimental effects of marine plastic pollution on the development of echinoderms, demonstrating that chemicals leached from plastic particles into sea water can produce strong developmental abnormalities via specific pathways, and therefore have the potential to impact on a wide range of organisms.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Ecotoxicology; Embryonic development; Gene regulation; Leachates; Microplastic; Sea urchin; Zinc;
English
13-dic-2022
2023
864
15 March 2023
160901
none
Paganos, P., Ullmann, C., Gaglio, D., Bonanomi, M., Salmistraro, N., Arnone, M., et al. (2023). Plastic leachate-induced toxicity during sea urchin embryonic development: Insights into the molecular pathways affected by PVC. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 864(15 March 2023) [10.1016/j.scitotenv.2022.160901].
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/399832
Citazioni
  • Scopus 10
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 9
Social impact