Background: There is a paucity of knowledge about the effects of COronaVIrus Disease-19 (COVID-19) on long-term frailty development or progression over time. Aim: This study aims to assess transitions in frailty status in older adults who survived hospitalization for COVID-19. Methods: This is a longitudinal panel study. A multidisciplinary outpatient follow-up service was established since summer 2020, for the evaluation of individuals discharged alive, after hospitalization due to COVID-19. Frailty status was assessed in-hospital and at follow-up using the clinical frailty scale (CFS). Main patients’ characteristics, including health, functional, cognitive, and psychological status were collected. Results: A total of 177 patients aged 65 years and older were evaluated until June 2022. They were predominantly male, with a median age of 70 (Q1–Q3 67–75) years and a median body mass index of 27.5 (Q1–Q3 24.9–30.6) kg/m2 at hospital admission. The median follow-up time was 6.3 (Q1–Q3 3.7–10.9) months. Sixty-one patients (34.5%) scored worse at CFS follow-up compared to hospital admission, and twenty-two patients (12.4%) became frail. Discussion and conclusion: This study shows that one out of three older patients previously hospitalized for COVID-19 had an unfavorable transition in CFS score during a median follow-up of nearly 6 months. Specific interventions to prevent frailty development or progression should be considered for patients at risk. Further studies are required to confirm our findings.

Ferrara, M., Zarcone, C., Tassistro, E., Rebora, P., Rossi, E., Luppi, F., et al. (2022). Frailty and long-COVID: is COVID-19 responsible for a transition in frailty status among older adults who survived hospitalization for COVID-19?. AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH [10.1007/s40520-022-02308-4].

Frailty and long-COVID: is COVID-19 responsible for a transition in frailty status among older adults who survived hospitalization for COVID-19?

Ferrara, Maria Cristina;Zarcone, Cristina;Tassistro, Elena;Rebora, Paola;Rossi, Emanuela;Luppi, Fabrizio;Foti, Giuseppe;Squillace, Nicola;Strepparava, Maria Grazia;Bonfanti, Paolo;Bellelli, Giuseppe
2022

Abstract

Background: There is a paucity of knowledge about the effects of COronaVIrus Disease-19 (COVID-19) on long-term frailty development or progression over time. Aim: This study aims to assess transitions in frailty status in older adults who survived hospitalization for COVID-19. Methods: This is a longitudinal panel study. A multidisciplinary outpatient follow-up service was established since summer 2020, for the evaluation of individuals discharged alive, after hospitalization due to COVID-19. Frailty status was assessed in-hospital and at follow-up using the clinical frailty scale (CFS). Main patients’ characteristics, including health, functional, cognitive, and psychological status were collected. Results: A total of 177 patients aged 65 years and older were evaluated until June 2022. They were predominantly male, with a median age of 70 (Q1–Q3 67–75) years and a median body mass index of 27.5 (Q1–Q3 24.9–30.6) kg/m2 at hospital admission. The median follow-up time was 6.3 (Q1–Q3 3.7–10.9) months. Sixty-one patients (34.5%) scored worse at CFS follow-up compared to hospital admission, and twenty-two patients (12.4%) became frail. Discussion and conclusion: This study shows that one out of three older patients previously hospitalized for COVID-19 had an unfavorable transition in CFS score during a median follow-up of nearly 6 months. Specific interventions to prevent frailty development or progression should be considered for patients at risk. Further studies are required to confirm our findings.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
COVID-19; Frailty; Geriatric assessment; Older;
English
Ferrara, M., Zarcone, C., Tassistro, E., Rebora, P., Rossi, E., Luppi, F., et al. (2022). Frailty and long-COVID: is COVID-19 responsible for a transition in frailty status among older adults who survived hospitalization for COVID-19?. AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH [10.1007/s40520-022-02308-4].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/398371
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