Importance: Understanding the long-term immune response against SARS-CoV-2 infection in children is crucial to optimize vaccination strategies. Although it is known that SARS-CoV-2 antibodies may persist in adults 12 months after infection, data are limited in the pediatric population. Objective: To examine long-term anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor-binding domain (S-RBD) IgG kinetics in children after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this single-center, prospective cohort study, patients were enrolled consecutively from April 1, 2020, to August 31, 2021, at the COVID-19 Family Cluster Follow-up Clinic, Department of Women's and Children's Health, University Hospital of Padua. A cohort of 252 COVID-19 family clusters underwent serologic follow-up at 1 to 4, 5 to 10, and more than 10 months after infection with quantification of anti-S-RBD IgG by chemiluminescent immunoassay. Exposures: SARS-CoV-2 infection. Results: Among 902 study participants, 697 had confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, including 351 children or older siblings (mean [SD] age, 8.6 [5.1] years) and 346 parents (mean [SD] age, 42.5 [7.1] years). Among 697 cases, 674 (96.7%) were asymptomatic or mild. Children had significantly higher S-RBD IgG titers than older patients across all follow-up time points, with an overall median S-RBD IgG titer in patients younger than 3 years 5-fold higher than adults (304.8 [IQR, 139.0-516.6] kBAU/L vs 55.6 [24.2-136.0] kBAU/L, P <.001). Longitudinal analysis of 56 study participants sampled at least twice during follow-up demonstrated the persistence of antibodies up to 10 months from infection in all age classes, despite a progressive decline over time. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of Italian children and adults following SARS-CoV-2 infection different kinetics of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were found across several age classes of individuals with asymptomatic or mild COVID-19, which could help in optimizing COVID-19 vaccination strategies and prevention policies. This work provides further evidence of sustained immune response in children up to 1 year after primary SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Di Chiara, C., Cantarutti, A., Costenaro, P., Donà, D., Bonfante, F., Cosma, C., et al. (2022). Long-term Immune Response to SARS-CoV-2 Infection among Children and Adults after Mild Infection. JAMA NETWORK OPEN, 5(7), 1-12 [10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.21616].

Long-term Immune Response to SARS-CoV-2 Infection among Children and Adults after Mild Infection

Cantarutti, A;
2022

Abstract

Importance: Understanding the long-term immune response against SARS-CoV-2 infection in children is crucial to optimize vaccination strategies. Although it is known that SARS-CoV-2 antibodies may persist in adults 12 months after infection, data are limited in the pediatric population. Objective: To examine long-term anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor-binding domain (S-RBD) IgG kinetics in children after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this single-center, prospective cohort study, patients were enrolled consecutively from April 1, 2020, to August 31, 2021, at the COVID-19 Family Cluster Follow-up Clinic, Department of Women's and Children's Health, University Hospital of Padua. A cohort of 252 COVID-19 family clusters underwent serologic follow-up at 1 to 4, 5 to 10, and more than 10 months after infection with quantification of anti-S-RBD IgG by chemiluminescent immunoassay. Exposures: SARS-CoV-2 infection. Results: Among 902 study participants, 697 had confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, including 351 children or older siblings (mean [SD] age, 8.6 [5.1] years) and 346 parents (mean [SD] age, 42.5 [7.1] years). Among 697 cases, 674 (96.7%) were asymptomatic or mild. Children had significantly higher S-RBD IgG titers than older patients across all follow-up time points, with an overall median S-RBD IgG titer in patients younger than 3 years 5-fold higher than adults (304.8 [IQR, 139.0-516.6] kBAU/L vs 55.6 [24.2-136.0] kBAU/L, P <.001). Longitudinal analysis of 56 study participants sampled at least twice during follow-up demonstrated the persistence of antibodies up to 10 months from infection in all age classes, despite a progressive decline over time. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of Italian children and adults following SARS-CoV-2 infection different kinetics of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were found across several age classes of individuals with asymptomatic or mild COVID-19, which could help in optimizing COVID-19 vaccination strategies and prevention policies. This work provides further evidence of sustained immune response in children up to 1 year after primary SARS-CoV-2 infection.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Adult; Antibodies, Viral; COVID-19 Vaccines; Child; Child Health; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; Immunity; Immunoglobulin G; Prospective Studies; SARS-CoV-2; Women's Health; COVID-19
English
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12
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Di Chiara, C., Cantarutti, A., Costenaro, P., Donà, D., Bonfante, F., Cosma, C., et al. (2022). Long-term Immune Response to SARS-CoV-2 Infection among Children and Adults after Mild Infection. JAMA NETWORK OPEN, 5(7), 1-12 [10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.21616].
Di Chiara, C; Cantarutti, A; Costenaro, P; Donà, D; Bonfante, F; Cosma, C; Ferrarese, M; Cozzani, S; Raffaella Petrara, M; Carmona, F; Liberati, C; Palma, P; Di Salvo, G; De Rossi, A; Plebani, M; Padoan, A; Giaquinto, C
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/397455
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