Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) contribute to the development of personality traits leading to adult borderline personality disorder (BPD). Neurocognitive changes could partly mediate the association between ACEs and BPD. We discuss how exposure to ACEs could induce alterations in neurocognition, which, in turn, would contribute to the development of BPD. We conducted a review of MEDLINE articles through 2021, documenting a link between ACEs, neurocognitive impairments, and BPD, and also focusing on the pairwise associations. ACEs appear to have a strong impact on neurocognition and are a predictive factor for BPD. Maltreated, abused, and emotionally invalidated children are more likely to present BPD traits. Neurocognitive impairments in adults exposed to ACEs and in patients with BPD arise from similar brain alterations in the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. These impairments seem to be linked with clinical dimensions of BPD: increased impulsivity to altered inhibitory control; dissociative experiences to nonspecific autobiographical memory; and emotionally biased facial recognition to unstable interpersonal relationships. This perspective review highlights the contributory role of neurocognition in the association between ACEs and BPD. Additional research is needed, however, on the interconnections among ACEs, neurocognition, and BPD. Future studies could also focus on developing tools to assess early adversity in BPD specifically and on psychotherapeutic approaches to promptly remedy neurocognitive impairments.

Estric, C., Calati, R., Lopez-Castroman, J. (2022). Adverse Childhood Experiences and Neurocognition in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Call-to-Action Perspective Review. HARVARD REVIEW OF PSYCHIATRY, 30(4), 248-260 [10.1097/HRP.0000000000000344].

Adverse Childhood Experiences and Neurocognition in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Call-to-Action Perspective Review

Calati R;
2022

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) contribute to the development of personality traits leading to adult borderline personality disorder (BPD). Neurocognitive changes could partly mediate the association between ACEs and BPD. We discuss how exposure to ACEs could induce alterations in neurocognition, which, in turn, would contribute to the development of BPD. We conducted a review of MEDLINE articles through 2021, documenting a link between ACEs, neurocognitive impairments, and BPD, and also focusing on the pairwise associations. ACEs appear to have a strong impact on neurocognition and are a predictive factor for BPD. Maltreated, abused, and emotionally invalidated children are more likely to present BPD traits. Neurocognitive impairments in adults exposed to ACEs and in patients with BPD arise from similar brain alterations in the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. These impairments seem to be linked with clinical dimensions of BPD: increased impulsivity to altered inhibitory control; dissociative experiences to nonspecific autobiographical memory; and emotionally biased facial recognition to unstable interpersonal relationships. This perspective review highlights the contributory role of neurocognition in the association between ACEs and BPD. Additional research is needed, however, on the interconnections among ACEs, neurocognition, and BPD. Future studies could also focus on developing tools to assess early adversity in BPD specifically and on psychotherapeutic approaches to promptly remedy neurocognitive impairments.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
borderline personality disorder; childhood trauma; early adversity; neurocognitive impairments; neuropsychology;
English
2022
30
4
248
260
none
Estric, C., Calati, R., Lopez-Castroman, J. (2022). Adverse Childhood Experiences and Neurocognition in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Call-to-Action Perspective Review. HARVARD REVIEW OF PSYCHIATRY, 30(4), 248-260 [10.1097/HRP.0000000000000344].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/395898
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