Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) arises from neuronal death due to complex interactions of genetic, molecular, and environmental factors. Currently, only two drugs, riluzole and edaravone, have been approved to slow the progression of this disease. However, ghrelin and other ligands of the GHS-R1a receptor have demonstrated interesting neuroprotective activities that could be exploited in this pathology. Ghrelin, a 28-amino acid hormone, primarily synthesized and secreted by oxyntic cells in the stomach wall, binds to the pituitary GHS-R1a and stimulates GH secretion; in addition, ghrelin is endowed with multiple extra endocrine bioactivities. Native ghrelin requires esterification with octanoic acid for binding to the GHS-R1a receptor; however, this esterified form is very labile and represents less than 10% of circulating ghrelin. A large number of synthetic compounds, the growth hormone secretagogues (GHS) encompassing short peptides, peptoids, and non-peptidic moieties, are capable of mimicking several biological activities of ghrelin, including stimulation of GH release, appetite, and elevation of blood IGF-I levels. GHS have demonstrated neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects in experimental models of pathologies both in vitro and in vivo. To illustrate, some GHS, currently under evaluation by regulatory agencies for the treatment of human cachexia, have a good safety profile and are safe for human use. Collectively, evidence suggests that ghrelin and cognate GHS may constitute potential therapies for ALS.

Meanti, R., Bresciani, E., Rizzi, L., Coco, S., Zambelli, V., Dimitroulas, A., et al. (2023). Potential Applications for Growth Hormone Secretagogues Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. CURRENT NEUROPHARMACOLOGY, 21(12), 2376-2394 [10.2174/1570159X20666220915103613].

Potential Applications for Growth Hormone Secretagogues Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Meanti, Ramona
Primo
;
Bresciani, Elena;Rizzi, Laura
;
Coco, Silvia;Zambelli, Vanessa;Molteni, Laura;Locatelli, Vittorio;Torsello, Antonio
2023

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) arises from neuronal death due to complex interactions of genetic, molecular, and environmental factors. Currently, only two drugs, riluzole and edaravone, have been approved to slow the progression of this disease. However, ghrelin and other ligands of the GHS-R1a receptor have demonstrated interesting neuroprotective activities that could be exploited in this pathology. Ghrelin, a 28-amino acid hormone, primarily synthesized and secreted by oxyntic cells in the stomach wall, binds to the pituitary GHS-R1a and stimulates GH secretion; in addition, ghrelin is endowed with multiple extra endocrine bioactivities. Native ghrelin requires esterification with octanoic acid for binding to the GHS-R1a receptor; however, this esterified form is very labile and represents less than 10% of circulating ghrelin. A large number of synthetic compounds, the growth hormone secretagogues (GHS) encompassing short peptides, peptoids, and non-peptidic moieties, are capable of mimicking several biological activities of ghrelin, including stimulation of GH release, appetite, and elevation of blood IGF-I levels. GHS have demonstrated neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects in experimental models of pathologies both in vitro and in vivo. To illustrate, some GHS, currently under evaluation by regulatory agencies for the treatment of human cachexia, have a good safety profile and are safe for human use. Collectively, evidence suggests that ghrelin and cognate GHS may constitute potential therapies for ALS.
Articolo in rivista - Review Essay
ALS; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; ghrelin; Growth hormone secretagogues; neurodegenerative diseases; neuroinflammation;
English
12-gen-2023
2023
21
12
2376
2394
none
Meanti, R., Bresciani, E., Rizzi, L., Coco, S., Zambelli, V., Dimitroulas, A., et al. (2023). Potential Applications for Growth Hormone Secretagogues Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. CURRENT NEUROPHARMACOLOGY, 21(12), 2376-2394 [10.2174/1570159X20666220915103613].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/392855
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