Objectives: Family is a major source of support for older chronically-ill patients and known to be associated with better self-care. Depression and self-care self-efficacy are associated with healthy behaviors and thus may serve as mechanisms by which family support influences self-care. We explored depression and self-care self-efficacy as mediators of the relationship between perceived family support and self-care. Methods: Five hundred forty-one older adults with multiple chronic illnesses were recruited from outpatients and community settings. Three structural equation models (SEM) were fit on cross-sectional data. We measured perceived family support (subscale of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, scores range 1-7), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, scores range 0-27), selfcare self-efficacy (Self-Care Self Efficacy Scale, standardized scores range 0-100), and self-care maintenance, monitoring, and management (Self-care of Chronic Illness Inventory, standardized scores range 0-100). Results: Participants (mean age = 76.6±7.3 yrs) were predominantly females (55.6%). In the full sample, depression and self-care self-efficacy mediated the relationship between perceived family support and self-care; in the gender-stratified SEM, men’s depression was no longer a significant mediator. Depression and self-care self-efficacy were significant mediators of the relation between perceived family support and self-care. Conclusion: In older chronically-ill patients, interventions addressing perceived family support may facilitate a rapid improvement in self-care self-efficacy and a decrease in depressive symptoms, particularly among women.

Iovino, P., Nolan, A., De Maria, M., Ausili, D., Matarese, M., Vellone, E., et al. (2022). The influence of social support on self-care is mediated by self-efficacy and depression in chronic illness: key findings from the ‘SODALITY’ observational study. AGING & MENTAL HEALTH, 1-9 [10.1080/13607863.2022.2056877].

The influence of social support on self-care is mediated by self-efficacy and depression in chronic illness: key findings from the ‘SODALITY’ observational study

Ausili D.;
2022

Abstract

Objectives: Family is a major source of support for older chronically-ill patients and known to be associated with better self-care. Depression and self-care self-efficacy are associated with healthy behaviors and thus may serve as mechanisms by which family support influences self-care. We explored depression and self-care self-efficacy as mediators of the relationship between perceived family support and self-care. Methods: Five hundred forty-one older adults with multiple chronic illnesses were recruited from outpatients and community settings. Three structural equation models (SEM) were fit on cross-sectional data. We measured perceived family support (subscale of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, scores range 1-7), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, scores range 0-27), selfcare self-efficacy (Self-Care Self Efficacy Scale, standardized scores range 0-100), and self-care maintenance, monitoring, and management (Self-care of Chronic Illness Inventory, standardized scores range 0-100). Results: Participants (mean age = 76.6±7.3 yrs) were predominantly females (55.6%). In the full sample, depression and self-care self-efficacy mediated the relationship between perceived family support and self-care; in the gender-stratified SEM, men’s depression was no longer a significant mediator. Depression and self-care self-efficacy were significant mediators of the relation between perceived family support and self-care. Conclusion: In older chronically-ill patients, interventions addressing perceived family support may facilitate a rapid improvement in self-care self-efficacy and a decrease in depressive symptoms, particularly among women.
Si
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
depression; Gender; self-care; self-efficacy; social support;
English
1
9
9
Iovino, P., Nolan, A., De Maria, M., Ausili, D., Matarese, M., Vellone, E., et al. (2022). The influence of social support on self-care is mediated by self-efficacy and depression in chronic illness: key findings from the ‘SODALITY’ observational study. AGING & MENTAL HEALTH, 1-9 [10.1080/13607863.2022.2056877].
Iovino, P; Nolan, A; De Maria, M; Ausili, D; Matarese, M; Vellone, E; Riegel, B
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/391709
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