The COVID-19 vaccine development timelines offered a unique opportunity to explore the public’s vaccine intention in an unusual situation characterised by great uncertainty about the vaccine’s features and the disease it intended to prevent. To advance our knowledge of vaccine intention mechanisms under these unusual circumstances, to plan effective vaccination strategies, and to better direct communication efforts in similar scenarios, this study explored i) COVID19-related information needs, information-seeking behaviours, and perceived trustworthiness of news media; ii) COVID-19 vaccination intention and its determinants, during the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic in Italy. In particular, it was investigated whether and to what extent the perception of severity and susceptibility to the infection, trust in authorities, and demographics shaped people’s vaccine intention. Between April and May 2020 in a cross-sectional study, 1373 Italian participants completed an online survey measuring demographic features, perception of the disease severity, disease risk perception, COVID19-related worry, disease-related information needs and behaviours, vaccination intention, and level of trust in authorities and news media. The leading information needs were the COVID-19 incubation period and transmission modalities, with the majority of people actively looking for information from one to three times a day. Despite uncertainty around the details of a COVID-19 vaccination, 68% of participants reported intending to be vaccinated for COVID-19. Greater COVID-19 vaccination intention was associated with having a regular history of seasonal flu vaccine, a greater COVID19-related worry, a higher perception of disease severity, and a higher trust in the Government. These findings further our understanding of vaccine intention in a pandemic scenario where a vaccine is still hypothetical and provide valuable information on the public’s representation of the infection and future acceptance of a vaccine to inform the development of communication interventions aiming to maximise adherence to vaccination programmes and to modify disease-related dysfunctional representations.

Russo, S., Bani, M., Ardenghi, S., Rampoldi, G., Strepparava, M. (2022). Waiting for the COVID-19 vaccine: vaccine intention, trust in authorities and information needs in an Italian sample. PSYCHOLOGY, HEALTH & MEDICINE, 1-18 [10.1080/13548506.2022.2105913].

Waiting for the COVID-19 vaccine: vaccine intention, trust in authorities and information needs in an Italian sample

Russo, S
;
Bani, M;Ardenghi, S;Rampoldi, G;Strepparava, MG
2022

Abstract

The COVID-19 vaccine development timelines offered a unique opportunity to explore the public’s vaccine intention in an unusual situation characterised by great uncertainty about the vaccine’s features and the disease it intended to prevent. To advance our knowledge of vaccine intention mechanisms under these unusual circumstances, to plan effective vaccination strategies, and to better direct communication efforts in similar scenarios, this study explored i) COVID19-related information needs, information-seeking behaviours, and perceived trustworthiness of news media; ii) COVID-19 vaccination intention and its determinants, during the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic in Italy. In particular, it was investigated whether and to what extent the perception of severity and susceptibility to the infection, trust in authorities, and demographics shaped people’s vaccine intention. Between April and May 2020 in a cross-sectional study, 1373 Italian participants completed an online survey measuring demographic features, perception of the disease severity, disease risk perception, COVID19-related worry, disease-related information needs and behaviours, vaccination intention, and level of trust in authorities and news media. The leading information needs were the COVID-19 incubation period and transmission modalities, with the majority of people actively looking for information from one to three times a day. Despite uncertainty around the details of a COVID-19 vaccination, 68% of participants reported intending to be vaccinated for COVID-19. Greater COVID-19 vaccination intention was associated with having a regular history of seasonal flu vaccine, a greater COVID19-related worry, a higher perception of disease severity, and a higher trust in the Government. These findings further our understanding of vaccine intention in a pandemic scenario where a vaccine is still hypothetical and provide valuable information on the public’s representation of the infection and future acceptance of a vaccine to inform the development of communication interventions aiming to maximise adherence to vaccination programmes and to modify disease-related dysfunctional representations.
No
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
coronavirus disease; COVID-19; COVID-19 vaccine; vaccination; vaccination intention; vaccine propensity;
English
1
18
18
Russo, S., Bani, M., Ardenghi, S., Rampoldi, G., Strepparava, M. (2022). Waiting for the COVID-19 vaccine: vaccine intention, trust in authorities and information needs in an Italian sample. PSYCHOLOGY, HEALTH & MEDICINE, 1-18 [10.1080/13548506.2022.2105913].
Russo, S; Bani, M; Ardenghi, S; Rampoldi, G; Strepparava, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/390187
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