Objective: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a frequent comorbid condition in adults with bipolar disorder. We performed a meta-analysis aimed at assessing sociodemographic and clinical correlates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in bipolar disorder. Method: We searched main electronic databases up to June 2021. Random-effects meta-analyses, with relevant meta-regression and quality-based sensitivity analyses, were carried out to estimate the association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and putative correlates, grading the quality of evidence. Results: We included 43 studies, based on 38 independent samples. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder participants were more likely to be males (odds ratio = 1.46; p < 0.001) and unemployed (odds ratio = 1.45; p = 0.045), and less likely to be married (odds ratio = 0.62; p = 0.014). They had an earlier onset of bipolar disorder (standardized mean difference = −0.36; p < 0.001); more mood episodes (standardized mean difference = 0.35; p = 0.007), particularly depressive (standardized mean difference = 0.30; p = 0.011) and mixed (standardized mean difference = 0.30; p = 0.031) ones; higher odds of using antidepressants (odds ratio = 1.80; p = 0.024) and attempted suicides (odds ratio = 1.83; p < 0.001) and lower odds of psychotic features (odds ratio = 0.63; p = 0.010). Moreover, they were more likely to have generalized anxiety disorder (odds ratio = 1.50; p = 0.019), panic disorder (odds ratio = 1.89; p < 0.001), social phobia (odds ratio = 1.61; p = 0.017), eating disorders (odds ratio = 1.91; p = 0.007), antisocial personality disorder (odds ratio = 3.59; p = 0.004) and substance (odds ratio = 2.29; p < 0.001) or alcohol (odds ratio = 2.28; p < 0.001) use disorders. Quality of the evidence was generally low or very low for the majority of correlates, except for bipolar disorder onset and alcohol/substance use disorders (high), and suicide attempts (moderate). Conclusion: Comorbid bipolar disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may have some distinctive clinical features including an earlier onset of bipolar disorder and higher comorbid alcohol/substance use disorder rates. Further research is needed to identify additional clinical characteristics of this comorbidity.

Bartoli, F., Callovini, T., Cavaleri, D., Cioni, R., Bachi, B., Calabrese, A., et al. (2022). Clinical correlates of comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults suffering from bipolar disorder: A meta-analysis. AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY [10.1177/00048674221106669].

Clinical correlates of comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults suffering from bipolar disorder: A meta-analysis

Bartoli F.
;
Callovini T.;Cavaleri D.;Cioni R. M.;Bachi B.;Calabrese A.;Moretti F.;Canestro A.;Morreale M.;Nasti C.;Palpella D.;Piacenti S.;Nacinovich R.;Riboldi I.;Crocamo C.;Carra G.
2022

Abstract

Objective: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a frequent comorbid condition in adults with bipolar disorder. We performed a meta-analysis aimed at assessing sociodemographic and clinical correlates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in bipolar disorder. Method: We searched main electronic databases up to June 2021. Random-effects meta-analyses, with relevant meta-regression and quality-based sensitivity analyses, were carried out to estimate the association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and putative correlates, grading the quality of evidence. Results: We included 43 studies, based on 38 independent samples. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder participants were more likely to be males (odds ratio = 1.46; p < 0.001) and unemployed (odds ratio = 1.45; p = 0.045), and less likely to be married (odds ratio = 0.62; p = 0.014). They had an earlier onset of bipolar disorder (standardized mean difference = −0.36; p < 0.001); more mood episodes (standardized mean difference = 0.35; p = 0.007), particularly depressive (standardized mean difference = 0.30; p = 0.011) and mixed (standardized mean difference = 0.30; p = 0.031) ones; higher odds of using antidepressants (odds ratio = 1.80; p = 0.024) and attempted suicides (odds ratio = 1.83; p < 0.001) and lower odds of psychotic features (odds ratio = 0.63; p = 0.010). Moreover, they were more likely to have generalized anxiety disorder (odds ratio = 1.50; p = 0.019), panic disorder (odds ratio = 1.89; p < 0.001), social phobia (odds ratio = 1.61; p = 0.017), eating disorders (odds ratio = 1.91; p = 0.007), antisocial personality disorder (odds ratio = 3.59; p = 0.004) and substance (odds ratio = 2.29; p < 0.001) or alcohol (odds ratio = 2.28; p < 0.001) use disorders. Quality of the evidence was generally low or very low for the majority of correlates, except for bipolar disorder onset and alcohol/substance use disorders (high), and suicide attempts (moderate). Conclusion: Comorbid bipolar disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may have some distinctive clinical features including an earlier onset of bipolar disorder and higher comorbid alcohol/substance use disorder rates. Further research is needed to identify additional clinical characteristics of this comorbidity.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; bipolar disorder; meta-analysis;
English
Bartoli, F., Callovini, T., Cavaleri, D., Cioni, R., Bachi, B., Calabrese, A., et al. (2022). Clinical correlates of comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults suffering from bipolar disorder: A meta-analysis. AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY [10.1177/00048674221106669].
Bartoli, F; Callovini, T; Cavaleri, D; Cioni, R; Bachi, B; Calabrese, A; Moretti, F; Canestro, A; Morreale, M; Nasti, C; Palpella, D; Piacenti, S; Nacinovich, R; Riboldi, I; Crocamo, C; Carra, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/389317
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