In Psychodiagnostics (1921), Hermann Rorschach described his form interpretation test as a “psychological experiment which, despite its simplicity, has proved to be of value in research and in general testing”. The experiment, based on the idea of the relationship between visual stimulus and fantastic or hallucinatory projection, relied on the technique of free interpretation of the inkblots. This technique had actually important antecedents, often overlooked in the specialist literature. A specific psychological and philosophical research path has developed this practice in studying the cognitive, affective, and imaginative functions in human beings, and predated the contribution of Rorschach by many years. In my contribution, I will focus on these antecedents. In particular, I will focus to the empirical and non-experimental approaches to the inkblots in the works of Leonardo da Vinci, Immanuel Kant, Justinus Kerner, and in the McEnery Stuart and Paine’s board game Gobolinks (1896). Then, I will focus on the experimental studies with inkblots carried out by some American, British, and Russian psychologists of the late 19th and the early 20th centuries (e.g., George Van Ness Dearborn, Stella Sharp, Edwin Kirkpatrick, Guy Montrose Whipple, Frederic Bartlett, and Fyodor Rybakov). In this historical perspective, Rorschach’s work will appear as a specific, systematic, and statistically supported development of a predated scientific heritage of psychometric studies, materials, and methods already known and used in psychological and experimental fields.

Molaro, A. (2022). From Leonardo to Rorschach: For a History of Inkblots. Intervento presentato a: XXIII Congress of the International Society for the Rorschach and Projective Methods, Ginevra, Svizzera.

From Leonardo to Rorschach: For a History of Inkblots

Molaro, A
2022

Abstract

In Psychodiagnostics (1921), Hermann Rorschach described his form interpretation test as a “psychological experiment which, despite its simplicity, has proved to be of value in research and in general testing”. The experiment, based on the idea of the relationship between visual stimulus and fantastic or hallucinatory projection, relied on the technique of free interpretation of the inkblots. This technique had actually important antecedents, often overlooked in the specialist literature. A specific psychological and philosophical research path has developed this practice in studying the cognitive, affective, and imaginative functions in human beings, and predated the contribution of Rorschach by many years. In my contribution, I will focus on these antecedents. In particular, I will focus to the empirical and non-experimental approaches to the inkblots in the works of Leonardo da Vinci, Immanuel Kant, Justinus Kerner, and in the McEnery Stuart and Paine’s board game Gobolinks (1896). Then, I will focus on the experimental studies with inkblots carried out by some American, British, and Russian psychologists of the late 19th and the early 20th centuries (e.g., George Van Ness Dearborn, Stella Sharp, Edwin Kirkpatrick, Guy Montrose Whipple, Frederic Bartlett, and Fyodor Rybakov). In this historical perspective, Rorschach’s work will appear as a specific, systematic, and statistically supported development of a predated scientific heritage of psychometric studies, materials, and methods already known and used in psychological and experimental fields.
No
relazione (orale)
Scientifica
Rorschach, Ink-blot test, History of psychology, Psychometric studies, Experimental psychology, Leonardo da Vinci, Immanuel Kant, Justinus Kerner, George Van Ness Dearborn.
English
XXIII Congress of the International Society for the Rorschach and Projective Methods
Molaro, A. (2022). From Leonardo to Rorschach: For a History of Inkblots. Intervento presentato a: XXIII Congress of the International Society for the Rorschach and Projective Methods, Ginevra, Svizzera.
Molaro, A
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
220714_ISR2022_Scientific-Programme.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Scientific Programme
Tipologia di allegato: Other attachments
Dimensione 318.37 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
318.37 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/387808
Citazioni
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
Social impact