Introduction: The approach to the abdominal wall surgical repair is dramatically changed in the last years. This study evaluates our institutional outcomes about the usage of biological meshes for abdominal wall repair in different setting: in elective surgery, in emergency surgery and in abdominal wall repair following open abdomen (OA) procedure. Methods: A database was prospectively conducted (January-December 2014) and data were reviewed for patients who underwent to an abdominal wall reconstruction with swine dermal non-cross linked collagens prostheses either in elective or emergency setting, and following OA/laparostomy procedure. Demographic data, co-morbidities, indications for surgery, intra-operative details, post-operative complications and outcome (peri-operative, 3, 6, 9-months) were analyzed. Results: A total of 30 cases were reported: 9 in elective surgery (Group 1), 4 in emergency surgery (Group 2) and 17 with abdominal wall closure following OA management (Group 3). Two meshes were removed: 1 in the Group 1 and 1 in the Group 3. During follow-up only one patient in the Group 3 had a recurrence of the incisional hernia. Mortality rate was 11.1 % at 3 months in Group 1, 0 % in the Group 2, and 29.4 % in peri-operative period in the Group 3. Conclusions: The use of non-cross linked biological meshes can be safe and versatile in different situations from elective to emergency surgery, and also for the reconstruction of the abdominal wall after OA procedure, with an acceptable recurrence and mortality rate.

Montori, G., Coccolini, F., Manfredi, R., Ceresoli, M., Campanati, L., Magnone, S., et al. (2015). One year experience of swine dermal non-crosslinked collagen prostheses for abdominal wall repairs in elective and emergency surgery. WORLD JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY SURGERY, 10(1) [10.1186/s13017-015-0023-8].

One year experience of swine dermal non-crosslinked collagen prostheses for abdominal wall repairs in elective and emergency surgery

Ceresoli M.;Ansaloni L.
2015

Abstract

Introduction: The approach to the abdominal wall surgical repair is dramatically changed in the last years. This study evaluates our institutional outcomes about the usage of biological meshes for abdominal wall repair in different setting: in elective surgery, in emergency surgery and in abdominal wall repair following open abdomen (OA) procedure. Methods: A database was prospectively conducted (January-December 2014) and data were reviewed for patients who underwent to an abdominal wall reconstruction with swine dermal non-cross linked collagens prostheses either in elective or emergency setting, and following OA/laparostomy procedure. Demographic data, co-morbidities, indications for surgery, intra-operative details, post-operative complications and outcome (peri-operative, 3, 6, 9-months) were analyzed. Results: A total of 30 cases were reported: 9 in elective surgery (Group 1), 4 in emergency surgery (Group 2) and 17 with abdominal wall closure following OA management (Group 3). Two meshes were removed: 1 in the Group 1 and 1 in the Group 3. During follow-up only one patient in the Group 3 had a recurrence of the incisional hernia. Mortality rate was 11.1 % at 3 months in Group 1, 0 % in the Group 2, and 29.4 % in peri-operative period in the Group 3. Conclusions: The use of non-cross linked biological meshes can be safe and versatile in different situations from elective to emergency surgery, and also for the reconstruction of the abdominal wall after OA procedure, with an acceptable recurrence and mortality rate.
No
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Abdominal wall repair; Biological mesh; Emergency surgery; Laparostomy; Open abdomen; Swine dermal collagen; Ventral hernia;
English
Montori, G., Coccolini, F., Manfredi, R., Ceresoli, M., Campanati, L., Magnone, S., et al. (2015). One year experience of swine dermal non-crosslinked collagen prostheses for abdominal wall repairs in elective and emergency surgery. WORLD JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY SURGERY, 10(1) [10.1186/s13017-015-0023-8].
Montori, G; Coccolini, F; Manfredi, R; Ceresoli, M; Campanati, L; Magnone, S; Pisano, M; Poiasina, E; Nita, G; Catena, F; Ansaloni, L
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/381284
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