Principled robotic implementations can be used to test hypothetical models of biological sensorimotor capabilities. Distinguishing features of this experimental strategy, often referred to as "bio-robotics" or "neuro-robotics", include the construction of some robot based on a theoretical model of the biological system under examination, and model-based comparisons between biological and robotic behaviours. This use of robots goes beyond mere replication of biological capacities in robotic systems (which is pursued in many biologically inspired robotic investigations), and significantly differs from analogous attempts to understand biological capacities by means of computer (non robotic) simulations. This paper explores ways in which biorobotic experiments connect to theoretical hypotheses about adaptive behaviours, along the dimensions of falsification, corroboration, and heuristic role in the discovery of unexpected facts. Significant methodological issues arising in bio-robotic experiments are addressed too, such as the problem of ensuring the correctness of bio-robotic implementations with respect to the underlying theoretical models, and the problem of identifying appropriate boundary conditions for the regular behaviour of both biological and artificial systems.

Datteri, E., Tamburrini, G. (2006). Bio-robotic experiments and scientific method. In L. Magnani, R. Dossena (a cura di), Computing, philosophy and cognition: proceedings of the European Computing and Philosophy Conference (ECAP 2004) (pp. 397-410). London : College Publications.

Bio-robotic experiments and scientific method

DATTERI, EDOARDO;
2006

Abstract

Principled robotic implementations can be used to test hypothetical models of biological sensorimotor capabilities. Distinguishing features of this experimental strategy, often referred to as "bio-robotics" or "neuro-robotics", include the construction of some robot based on a theoretical model of the biological system under examination, and model-based comparisons between biological and robotic behaviours. This use of robots goes beyond mere replication of biological capacities in robotic systems (which is pursued in many biologically inspired robotic investigations), and significantly differs from analogous attempts to understand biological capacities by means of computer (non robotic) simulations. This paper explores ways in which biorobotic experiments connect to theoretical hypotheses about adaptive behaviours, along the dimensions of falsification, corroboration, and heuristic role in the discovery of unexpected facts. Significant methodological issues arising in bio-robotic experiments are addressed too, such as the problem of ensuring the correctness of bio-robotic implementations with respect to the underlying theoretical models, and the problem of identifying appropriate boundary conditions for the regular behaviour of both biological and artificial systems.
Capitolo o saggio
filosofia della scienza; filosofia dell'intelligenza artificiale; biorobotica; neuroscienze
English
Computing, philosophy and cognition: proceedings of the European Computing and Philosophy Conference (ECAP 2004)
1904987249
Datteri, E., Tamburrini, G. (2006). Bio-robotic experiments and scientific method. In L. Magnani, R. Dossena (a cura di), Computing, philosophy and cognition: proceedings of the European Computing and Philosophy Conference (ECAP 2004) (pp. 397-410). London : College Publications.
Datteri, E; Tamburrini, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/38074
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