Objective: Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most disabling and costly conditions worldwide. It remains unclear why many individuals experience persistent and recurrent symptoms after an acute episode whereas others do not. A longitudinal cohort study was established to address this problem. We aimed to; (1) evaluate whether promising and potentially modifiable biological, psychological, social and behavioural factors, along with their possible interactions, predict LBP outcome after an acute episode; (2) compare these factors between individuals with and without acute LBP; and (3) evaluate the time-course of changes in these factors from LBP onset. This paper outlines the methodology and compares baseline characteristics between acute LBP and control, and LBP participants with and without follow-up. Results: 133 individuals with acute LBP and 74 pain-free individuals participated. Bio-psycho-social and behavioural measures were collected at baseline and 3-monthly for 12 months (LBP) or 3 months (control). Pain and disability were recorded fortnightly. Baseline characteristics were mostly similar between those who did and did not return for follow-up. Initial analyses of this cohort have revealed important insights into the pathways involved in acute-to-chronic LBP. These and future findings will provide new targets for treatment and prevention of persistent and recurrent LBP.

Klyne, D., van den Hoorn, W., Barbe, M., Cholewicki, J., M. Hall, L., Khan, A., et al. (2020). Cohort profile: why do people keep hurting their back?. BMC RESEARCH NOTES, 13(1) [10.1186/s13104-020-05356-z].

Cohort profile: why do people keep hurting their back?

Meroni R.;
2020

Abstract

Objective: Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most disabling and costly conditions worldwide. It remains unclear why many individuals experience persistent and recurrent symptoms after an acute episode whereas others do not. A longitudinal cohort study was established to address this problem. We aimed to; (1) evaluate whether promising and potentially modifiable biological, psychological, social and behavioural factors, along with their possible interactions, predict LBP outcome after an acute episode; (2) compare these factors between individuals with and without acute LBP; and (3) evaluate the time-course of changes in these factors from LBP onset. This paper outlines the methodology and compares baseline characteristics between acute LBP and control, and LBP participants with and without follow-up. Results: 133 individuals with acute LBP and 74 pain-free individuals participated. Bio-psycho-social and behavioural measures were collected at baseline and 3-monthly for 12 months (LBP) or 3 months (control). Pain and disability were recorded fortnightly. Baseline characteristics were mostly similar between those who did and did not return for follow-up. Initial analyses of this cohort have revealed important insights into the pathways involved in acute-to-chronic LBP. These and future findings will provide new targets for treatment and prevention of persistent and recurrent LBP.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Acute to chronic; Behavioural factors; Biological factors; Low back pain (LBP); Psychological factors; Social factors;
English
2020
13
1
538
none
Klyne, D., van den Hoorn, W., Barbe, M., Cholewicki, J., M. Hall, L., Khan, A., et al. (2020). Cohort profile: why do people keep hurting their back?. BMC RESEARCH NOTES, 13(1) [10.1186/s13104-020-05356-z].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/379857
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