Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) represents the fat depot located between the myocardium and the visceral pericardial layer. Far from being an inert tissue, EAT has been recognized as secreting a large amount of bioactive molecules called adipokines, which have numerous exocrine and paracrine effects. Recent evidence demonstrates that pericoronary adipose tissue (PCAT) – the EAT directly surrounding the coronary arteries – has a complex bidirectional interaction with the underlying vascular wall. While in normal conditions this mutual cross-talk helps maintain the homeostasis of the vascular wall, dysfunctional PCAT produces deleterious pro-inflammatory adipokines involved in atherogenesis. Importantly, PCAT inflammation has been associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and major cardiovascular events. This review aims to provide an overview of the imaging techniques used to assess EAT, with a specific focus on cardiac computed tomography (CCT), which has become the key modality in this field. In contrast to echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), CCT is not only able to visualize and precisely quantify EAT, but also to assess the coronary arteries and the PCAT simultaneously. In recent years, several papers have shown the utility of using CCT-derived PCAT attenuation as a surrogate measure of coronary inflammation. This noninvasive imaging biomarker may potentially be used to monitor patient responses to new antinflammatory drugs for the treatment of CAD.

Guglielmo, M., Lin, A., Dey, D., Baggiano, A., Fusini, L., Muscogiuri, G., et al. (2021). Epicardial fat and coronary artery disease: Role of cardiac imaging. ATHEROSCLEROSIS, 321, 30-38 [10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2021.02.008].

Epicardial fat and coronary artery disease: Role of cardiac imaging

Muscogiuri G;
2021

Abstract

Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) represents the fat depot located between the myocardium and the visceral pericardial layer. Far from being an inert tissue, EAT has been recognized as secreting a large amount of bioactive molecules called adipokines, which have numerous exocrine and paracrine effects. Recent evidence demonstrates that pericoronary adipose tissue (PCAT) – the EAT directly surrounding the coronary arteries – has a complex bidirectional interaction with the underlying vascular wall. While in normal conditions this mutual cross-talk helps maintain the homeostasis of the vascular wall, dysfunctional PCAT produces deleterious pro-inflammatory adipokines involved in atherogenesis. Importantly, PCAT inflammation has been associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and major cardiovascular events. This review aims to provide an overview of the imaging techniques used to assess EAT, with a specific focus on cardiac computed tomography (CCT), which has become the key modality in this field. In contrast to echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), CCT is not only able to visualize and precisely quantify EAT, but also to assess the coronary arteries and the PCAT simultaneously. In recent years, several papers have shown the utility of using CCT-derived PCAT attenuation as a surrogate measure of coronary inflammation. This noninvasive imaging biomarker may potentially be used to monitor patient responses to new antinflammatory drugs for the treatment of CAD.
Articolo in rivista - Review Essay
Scientifica
Cardiac CT; Cardiac magnetic resonance; Echocardiography; Epicardial adipose tissue; Multimodality imaging; Pericoronary adipose tissue;
English
Guglielmo, M., Lin, A., Dey, D., Baggiano, A., Fusini, L., Muscogiuri, G., et al. (2021). Epicardial fat and coronary artery disease: Role of cardiac imaging. ATHEROSCLEROSIS, 321, 30-38 [10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2021.02.008].
Guglielmo, M; Lin, A; Dey, D; Baggiano, A; Fusini, L; Muscogiuri, G; Pontone, G
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/377016
Citazioni
  • Scopus 13
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 17
Social impact