Purpose: To compare community girls at risk and not at risk for binge eating (BE) in attachment representations through a narrative interview and to test the predictive role of attachment pattern(s) on the risk of binge eating among community girls. Methods: From 772 community adolescents of both sexes (33% boys) screened through the Binge Eating Scale (BES), 112 girls between 14 and 18 years, 56 placed in a group at risk for binge eating (BEG), and 56 matched peers, not at risk (NBEG), were assessed in attachment representations through the Friends and Family Interview (FFI). Results: (1) Compared to NBEG, girls in the BEG showed more insecure-preoccupied classifications and scores, together with lower narrative coherence, mother’s representation as a secure base/safe haven, reflective functioning, adaptive response, and more anger toward mother. (2) Both insecure-dismissing and preoccupied patterns predicted 15% more binge-eating symptoms in the whole sample of community girls. Conclusions: Insecure attachment representations are confirmed risk factors for more binge eating, affecting emotional regulation and leading to “emotional eating”, thus a dimensional assessment of attachment could be helpful for prevention and intervention. Implications and limits are discussed. Level of evidence: III. Evidence obtained from cohort or case–control analytic studies

Pace, C., Muzi, S., Parolin, L., Milesi, A., Tognasso, G., Santona, A. (2022). Binge eating attitudes in community adolescent sample and relationships with interview-assessed attachment representations in girls: a multi-center study from North Italy. EATING AND WEIGHT DISORDERS, 27(2), 495-504 [10.1007/s40519-021-01183-8].

Binge eating attitudes in community adolescent sample and relationships with interview-assessed attachment representations in girls: a multi-center study from North Italy

Pace C. S.
;
Parolin L.;Milesi A.;Tognasso G.;Santona A.
2022

Abstract

Purpose: To compare community girls at risk and not at risk for binge eating (BE) in attachment representations through a narrative interview and to test the predictive role of attachment pattern(s) on the risk of binge eating among community girls. Methods: From 772 community adolescents of both sexes (33% boys) screened through the Binge Eating Scale (BES), 112 girls between 14 and 18 years, 56 placed in a group at risk for binge eating (BEG), and 56 matched peers, not at risk (NBEG), were assessed in attachment representations through the Friends and Family Interview (FFI). Results: (1) Compared to NBEG, girls in the BEG showed more insecure-preoccupied classifications and scores, together with lower narrative coherence, mother’s representation as a secure base/safe haven, reflective functioning, adaptive response, and more anger toward mother. (2) Both insecure-dismissing and preoccupied patterns predicted 15% more binge-eating symptoms in the whole sample of community girls. Conclusions: Insecure attachment representations are confirmed risk factors for more binge eating, affecting emotional regulation and leading to “emotional eating”, thus a dimensional assessment of attachment could be helpful for prevention and intervention. Implications and limits are discussed. Level of evidence: III. Evidence obtained from cohort or case–control analytic studies
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Adolescence; Attachment; Binge eating; Community sample; Friends & Family Interview;
English
12-apr-2021
2022
27
2
495
504
none
Pace, C., Muzi, S., Parolin, L., Milesi, A., Tognasso, G., Santona, A. (2022). Binge eating attitudes in community adolescent sample and relationships with interview-assessed attachment representations in girls: a multi-center study from North Italy. EATING AND WEIGHT DISORDERS, 27(2), 495-504 [10.1007/s40519-021-01183-8].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/371802
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