Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical and other cancers and represents a significant global health burden. HPV vaccines demonstrate excellent efficacy in clinical trials and effectiveness in national immunization programmes against the most prevalent genotype, HPV16. It is unclear whether the greater protection conferred by vaccine-induced antibodies, compared to natural infection antibodies, is due to differences in antibody magnitude and/or specificity. We explore the contribution of the surface-exposed loops of the major capsid protein to antigenic domains recognized by vaccine and natural infection neutralizing antibodies. Chimeric pseudoviruses incorporating individual (BC, DE, EF, FG, HI) or combined (All: BC/DE/EF/FG/HI) loop swaps between the target (HPV16) and control (HPV35) genotypes were generated, purified by ultracentrifugation and characterized by SDS-PAGE and electron microscopy. Neutralizing antibody data were subjected to hierarchical clustering and outcomes modeled on the HPV16 capsomer crystal model. Vaccine antibodies exhibited an FG loop preference followed by the EF and HI loops while natural infection antibodies displayed a more diverse pattern, most frequently against the EF loop followed by BC and FG. Both vaccine and natural infection antibodies demonstrated a clear requirement for multiple loops. Crystal modeling of these neutralizing antibody patterns suggested natural infection antibodies typically target the outer rim of the capsomer while vaccine antibodies target the central ring around the capsomer lumen. Chimeric pseudoviruses are useful tools for probing vaccine and natural infection antibody specificity. These data add to the evidence base for the effectiveness of an important public health intervention. IMPORTANCE The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) major virus coat (capsid) protein is a target for antibodies induced by both natural infection and vaccination. Vaccine-induced immunity is highly protective against HPV16-related infection and disease while natural infection associated immunity significantly less so. For this study, we created chimeric functional pseudoviruses based upon an antigenically distant HPV genotype (HPV35) resistant to HPV16-specific antibodies with inserted capsid surface fragments (external loops) from HPV16. By using these chimeric pseudoviruses in functional neutralization assays we were able to highlight specific and distinct areas on the capsid surface recognized by both natural infection and vaccine induced antibodies. These data improve our understanding of the difference between natural infection and vaccine induced HPV16-specific immunity.

Godi, A., Vaghadia, S., Cocuzza, C., Miller, E., & Beddows, S. (2022). Contribution of Surface-Exposed Loops on the HPV16 Capsid to Antigenic Domains Recognized by Vaccine or Natural Infection Induced Neutralizing Antibodies. MICROBIOLOGY SPECTRUM, 10(3) [10.1128/spectrum.00779-22].

Contribution of Surface-Exposed Loops on the HPV16 Capsid to Antigenic Domains Recognized by Vaccine or Natural Infection Induced Neutralizing Antibodies

Cocuzza, Clementina;
2022

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical and other cancers and represents a significant global health burden. HPV vaccines demonstrate excellent efficacy in clinical trials and effectiveness in national immunization programmes against the most prevalent genotype, HPV16. It is unclear whether the greater protection conferred by vaccine-induced antibodies, compared to natural infection antibodies, is due to differences in antibody magnitude and/or specificity. We explore the contribution of the surface-exposed loops of the major capsid protein to antigenic domains recognized by vaccine and natural infection neutralizing antibodies. Chimeric pseudoviruses incorporating individual (BC, DE, EF, FG, HI) or combined (All: BC/DE/EF/FG/HI) loop swaps between the target (HPV16) and control (HPV35) genotypes were generated, purified by ultracentrifugation and characterized by SDS-PAGE and electron microscopy. Neutralizing antibody data were subjected to hierarchical clustering and outcomes modeled on the HPV16 capsomer crystal model. Vaccine antibodies exhibited an FG loop preference followed by the EF and HI loops while natural infection antibodies displayed a more diverse pattern, most frequently against the EF loop followed by BC and FG. Both vaccine and natural infection antibodies demonstrated a clear requirement for multiple loops. Crystal modeling of these neutralizing antibody patterns suggested natural infection antibodies typically target the outer rim of the capsomer while vaccine antibodies target the central ring around the capsomer lumen. Chimeric pseudoviruses are useful tools for probing vaccine and natural infection antibody specificity. These data add to the evidence base for the effectiveness of an important public health intervention. IMPORTANCE The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) major virus coat (capsid) protein is a target for antibodies induced by both natural infection and vaccination. Vaccine-induced immunity is highly protective against HPV16-related infection and disease while natural infection associated immunity significantly less so. For this study, we created chimeric functional pseudoviruses based upon an antigenically distant HPV genotype (HPV35) resistant to HPV16-specific antibodies with inserted capsid surface fragments (external loops) from HPV16. By using these chimeric pseudoviruses in functional neutralization assays we were able to highlight specific and distinct areas on the capsid surface recognized by both natural infection and vaccine induced antibodies. These data improve our understanding of the difference between natural infection and vaccine induced HPV16-specific immunity.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
human papillomavirus; neutralizing antibodies; pseudovirus; surface-exposed loops;
English
Godi, A., Vaghadia, S., Cocuzza, C., Miller, E., & Beddows, S. (2022). Contribution of Surface-Exposed Loops on the HPV16 Capsid to Antigenic Domains Recognized by Vaccine or Natural Infection Induced Neutralizing Antibodies. MICROBIOLOGY SPECTRUM, 10(3) [10.1128/spectrum.00779-22].
Godi, A; Vaghadia, S; Cocuzza, C; Miller, E; Beddows, S
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/371202
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