Temporal Binding Window (TBW) represents a reliable index of efficient multisensory integration process, which allows individuals to infer which sensory inputs from different modalities pertain to the same event. TBW alterations have been reported in some neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders and seem to negatively affects cognition and behavior. So far, it is still unknown whether deficits of multisensory integration, as indexed by an abnormal TBW, are present even in Multiple Sclerosis. We addressed this issue by testing 25 participants affected by relapsing–remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Participants completed a simultaneity judgment task (SJ2) to assess the audio-visual TBW; two unimodal SJ2 versions were used as control tasks. Individuals with RRMS showed an enlarged audio-visual TBW (width range = from − 166 ms to + 198 ms), as compared to healthy controls (width range = − 177/ + 66 ms), thus showing an increased tendency to integrate temporally asynchronous visual and auditory stimuli. Instead, simultaneity perception of unimodal (visual or auditory) events overall did not differ from that of controls. These results provide first evidence of a selective deficit of multisensory integration in individuals affected by RRMS, besides the well-known motor and cognitive impairments. The reduced multisensory temporal acuity is likely caused by a disruption of the neural interplay between different sensory systems caused by multiple sclerosis.

Giurgola, S., Casati, C., Stampatori, C., Perucca, L., Mattioli, F., Vallar, G., et al. (2022). Abnormal multisensory integration in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 240(3), 953-968 [10.1007/s00221-022-06310-0].

Abnormal multisensory integration in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis

Giurgola S.
;
Vallar G.;Bolognini N.
2022

Abstract

Temporal Binding Window (TBW) represents a reliable index of efficient multisensory integration process, which allows individuals to infer which sensory inputs from different modalities pertain to the same event. TBW alterations have been reported in some neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders and seem to negatively affects cognition and behavior. So far, it is still unknown whether deficits of multisensory integration, as indexed by an abnormal TBW, are present even in Multiple Sclerosis. We addressed this issue by testing 25 participants affected by relapsing–remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Participants completed a simultaneity judgment task (SJ2) to assess the audio-visual TBW; two unimodal SJ2 versions were used as control tasks. Individuals with RRMS showed an enlarged audio-visual TBW (width range = from − 166 ms to + 198 ms), as compared to healthy controls (width range = − 177/ + 66 ms), thus showing an increased tendency to integrate temporally asynchronous visual and auditory stimuli. Instead, simultaneity perception of unimodal (visual or auditory) events overall did not differ from that of controls. These results provide first evidence of a selective deficit of multisensory integration in individuals affected by RRMS, besides the well-known motor and cognitive impairments. The reduced multisensory temporal acuity is likely caused by a disruption of the neural interplay between different sensory systems caused by multiple sclerosis.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Auditory; Multiple sclerosis; Multisensory integration; Sensory processing; Temporal binding window; Visual;
English
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968
16
Giurgola, S., Casati, C., Stampatori, C., Perucca, L., Mattioli, F., Vallar, G., et al. (2022). Abnormal multisensory integration in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 240(3), 953-968 [10.1007/s00221-022-06310-0].
Giurgola, S; Casati, C; Stampatori, C; Perucca, L; Mattioli, F; Vallar, G; Bolognini, N
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/367144
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