Objective: Soluble CD14 (sCD14) plays an important role in the innate immune response of the oral cavity. The investigation of this biomarker for detection of carious lesions is an even more actual procedure due to its non-invasiveness and the ease of withdrawal. The purpose of the present observational case-control study was to evaluate whether the quantification of sCD14 in children and adolescent’s saliva can discriminate healthy subjects from those suffering from tooth decay. Materials and Methods: 164 subjects (6 to 17 years) were selected and divided into 2 groups: Those with at least 1 decayed tooth were assigned to group Decayed (n = 82) and those free from dental caries to group Healthy (n = 82). The amount of salivary soluble CD14 was quantified. Results: Mean salivary soluble CD14 was 28.3 ± 10.8 μg/mL in the Healthy group and 22 ± 9.6 μg/mL in the Decayed group. A hurdle model was applied to the data to estimate both the probability of having carious lesions and their number in relation to sCD14 levels. sCD14 was strongly associated (p < 0.01) with an inverse relation to both the probability of having caries and their number (falling rate of 5% per unit CD14 μg/mL). Conclusions: This data confirms the relationship between sCD14 and the presence of dental caries. However, there is no clear cut off level between healthy and unhealthy subjects, so it is currently not possible to use sCD14 as a biomarker to determine the risk of decays.

Pellegrini, G., Maddalone, M., Malvezzi, M., Toma, M., Del Fabbro, M., Canciani, E., et al. (2021). SCD14 level in saliva of children and adolescents with and without dental caries, a hurdle model. CHILDREN, 8(8) [10.3390/children8080679].

SCD14 level in saliva of children and adolescents with and without dental caries, a hurdle model

Maddalone M.
Co-primo
;
2021

Abstract

Objective: Soluble CD14 (sCD14) plays an important role in the innate immune response of the oral cavity. The investigation of this biomarker for detection of carious lesions is an even more actual procedure due to its non-invasiveness and the ease of withdrawal. The purpose of the present observational case-control study was to evaluate whether the quantification of sCD14 in children and adolescent’s saliva can discriminate healthy subjects from those suffering from tooth decay. Materials and Methods: 164 subjects (6 to 17 years) were selected and divided into 2 groups: Those with at least 1 decayed tooth were assigned to group Decayed (n = 82) and those free from dental caries to group Healthy (n = 82). The amount of salivary soluble CD14 was quantified. Results: Mean salivary soluble CD14 was 28.3 ± 10.8 μg/mL in the Healthy group and 22 ± 9.6 μg/mL in the Decayed group. A hurdle model was applied to the data to estimate both the probability of having carious lesions and their number in relation to sCD14 levels. sCD14 was strongly associated (p < 0.01) with an inverse relation to both the probability of having caries and their number (falling rate of 5% per unit CD14 μg/mL). Conclusions: This data confirms the relationship between sCD14 and the presence of dental caries. However, there is no clear cut off level between healthy and unhealthy subjects, so it is currently not possible to use sCD14 as a biomarker to determine the risk of decays.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Adolescents; CD14; Children; Decay; Dental caries; Saliva; Tooth;
English
Pellegrini, G., Maddalone, M., Malvezzi, M., Toma, M., Del Fabbro, M., Canciani, E., et al. (2021). SCD14 level in saliva of children and adolescents with and without dental caries, a hurdle model. CHILDREN, 8(8) [10.3390/children8080679].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/365975
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