The Gomati and Nea Roda ophiolites are located into the Serbo-Macedonian massif of the Chalkidiki peninsula (Northern Greece). The present work focuses on the variability of platinum-group elements (PGEs), geochemistry, spinel mineral chemistry, and platinum-group minerals (PGMs) — base metal minerals (BMMs) assemblage in chromitites of three Gomati localities (St. George, Tripes, and Limonadika) and Nea Roda. The studied chromitites show variable textures and are heavily altered. Primary silicates are almost completely replaced by chlorite, and chromite rims are altered into ferrian chromite. The variability of spinel mineral chemistry in terms of Cr# [Cr/(Cr + Al)] and Mg# [Mg/(Mg + Fe2+)], and the PGE contents, argues for a genesis in a supra-subduction setting (SSZ), at different stratigraphic positions in the ophiolite section. Chromitites from Tripes have the lowest Cr# (0.5–0.6) and the highest PGE contents (3516 ppb), similar to some chromitites formed in small magma chambers in the cumulate sections above the Moho. The high PGE contents of Tripes chromitites are due to an IPGEs-enriched melt derived from critical melting of mantle peridotites. Limonadika and St. George show the highest Cr# (0.77–0.96 and 0.74–0.87, respectively) and variable PGE contents (175 ppb and 383 ppb on average respectively), compatible with a genesis from boninitic magmas in the mantle section. Nea Roda chromitites have intermediate to high Cr# (0.66–0.75) and low PGE contents (135 ppb on average) and show similarities to other intermediate chromitites formed from evolving magma sources at subduction initiation. BMMs detected in both ophiolites are primary (pentlandite) and secondary (mainly millerite and heazlewoodite) sulfides. All the detected PGMs are primary, crystallized from the melt, and entrapped into chromite, and they are mainly laurites. In the studied chromitites, the absence of alloys indicates that the circulating fluids during chloritization were at high fS2 and fO2, and did not remobilize the PGEs. The same fluids are probably responsible for the low-T crystallization of an uncommon suite of arsenides and antimonides at St. George.

Bussolesi, M., Grieco, G., Zaccarini, F., Cavallo, A., Tzamos, E., & Storni, N. (2022). Chromite compositional variability and associated PGE enrichments in chromitites from the Gomati and Nea Roda ophiolite, Chalkidiki, Northern Greece. MINERALIUM DEPOSITA [10.1007/s00126-022-01109-z].

Chromite compositional variability and associated PGE enrichments in chromitites from the Gomati and Nea Roda ophiolite, Chalkidiki, Northern Greece

Bussolesi, Micol
Primo
;
Cavallo, Alessandro;
2022

Abstract

The Gomati and Nea Roda ophiolites are located into the Serbo-Macedonian massif of the Chalkidiki peninsula (Northern Greece). The present work focuses on the variability of platinum-group elements (PGEs), geochemistry, spinel mineral chemistry, and platinum-group minerals (PGMs) — base metal minerals (BMMs) assemblage in chromitites of three Gomati localities (St. George, Tripes, and Limonadika) and Nea Roda. The studied chromitites show variable textures and are heavily altered. Primary silicates are almost completely replaced by chlorite, and chromite rims are altered into ferrian chromite. The variability of spinel mineral chemistry in terms of Cr# [Cr/(Cr + Al)] and Mg# [Mg/(Mg + Fe2+)], and the PGE contents, argues for a genesis in a supra-subduction setting (SSZ), at different stratigraphic positions in the ophiolite section. Chromitites from Tripes have the lowest Cr# (0.5–0.6) and the highest PGE contents (3516 ppb), similar to some chromitites formed in small magma chambers in the cumulate sections above the Moho. The high PGE contents of Tripes chromitites are due to an IPGEs-enriched melt derived from critical melting of mantle peridotites. Limonadika and St. George show the highest Cr# (0.77–0.96 and 0.74–0.87, respectively) and variable PGE contents (175 ppb and 383 ppb on average respectively), compatible with a genesis from boninitic magmas in the mantle section. Nea Roda chromitites have intermediate to high Cr# (0.66–0.75) and low PGE contents (135 ppb on average) and show similarities to other intermediate chromitites formed from evolving magma sources at subduction initiation. BMMs detected in both ophiolites are primary (pentlandite) and secondary (mainly millerite and heazlewoodite) sulfides. All the detected PGMs are primary, crystallized from the melt, and entrapped into chromite, and they are mainly laurites. In the studied chromitites, the absence of alloys indicates that the circulating fluids during chloritization were at high fS2 and fO2, and did not remobilize the PGEs. The same fluids are probably responsible for the low-T crystallization of an uncommon suite of arsenides and antimonides at St. George.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Chromitite; Greece; Ophiolites; Platinum group elements; Supra-Moho;
English
20
Bussolesi, M., Grieco, G., Zaccarini, F., Cavallo, A., Tzamos, E., & Storni, N. (2022). Chromite compositional variability and associated PGE enrichments in chromitites from the Gomati and Nea Roda ophiolite, Chalkidiki, Northern Greece. MINERALIUM DEPOSITA [10.1007/s00126-022-01109-z].
Bussolesi, M; Grieco, G; Zaccarini, F; Cavallo, A; Tzamos, E; Storni, N
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/365330
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