Detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) has prognostic value in many hematologic malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Quantitative MRD data can be obtained with real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) analysis of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements, breakpoint fusion regions of chromosome aberrations, fusion-gene transcripts, aberrant genes, or aberrantly expressed genes, their application being dependent on the type of disease. RQ-PCR analysis can be performed with SYBR Green I, hydrolysis (TaqMan) probes, or hybridization (LightCycler) probes, as detection system in several RQ-PCR instruments. Dependent on the type of MRD-PCR target, different types of oligonucleotides; can be used for specific detection, such as an allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) probe, an ASO forward primer, an ASO reverse primer, or germline probe and primers. To assess the quantity and quality of the RNA/DNA, one or more control genes must be included. Finally, the interpretation of RQ-PCR MRD data needs standardized criteria and reporting of MRD data needs international uniformity. Several European networks have now been established and common guidelines for data analysis and for reporting of MRD data are being developed. These networks also include standardization of technology as well as regular quality control rounds, both being essential for the introduction of RQ-PCR-based MRD detection in multicenter clinical treatment protocols.

van der Velden, V., Hochhaus, A., Cazzaniga, G., Szczepanski, T., Gabert, J., van Dongen, J. (2003). Detection of minimal residual disease in hematologic malignancies by real-time quantitative PCR: Principles, approaches, and laboratory aspects. LEUKEMIA, 17(6), 1013-1034 [10.1038/sj.leu.2402922].

Detection of minimal residual disease in hematologic malignancies by real-time quantitative PCR: Principles, approaches, and laboratory aspects

Cazzaniga G.;
2003

Abstract

Detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) has prognostic value in many hematologic malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Quantitative MRD data can be obtained with real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) analysis of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements, breakpoint fusion regions of chromosome aberrations, fusion-gene transcripts, aberrant genes, or aberrantly expressed genes, their application being dependent on the type of disease. RQ-PCR analysis can be performed with SYBR Green I, hydrolysis (TaqMan) probes, or hybridization (LightCycler) probes, as detection system in several RQ-PCR instruments. Dependent on the type of MRD-PCR target, different types of oligonucleotides; can be used for specific detection, such as an allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) probe, an ASO forward primer, an ASO reverse primer, or germline probe and primers. To assess the quantity and quality of the RNA/DNA, one or more control genes must be included. Finally, the interpretation of RQ-PCR MRD data needs standardized criteria and reporting of MRD data needs international uniformity. Several European networks have now been established and common guidelines for data analysis and for reporting of MRD data are being developed. These networks also include standardization of technology as well as regular quality control rounds, both being essential for the introduction of RQ-PCR-based MRD detection in multicenter clinical treatment protocols.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Fusion genes; Immunoglobulin; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Minimal residual disease (MRD); Multiple myeloma; Real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR); T-cell receptor;
English
1013
1034
22
van der Velden, V., Hochhaus, A., Cazzaniga, G., Szczepanski, T., Gabert, J., van Dongen, J. (2003). Detection of minimal residual disease in hematologic malignancies by real-time quantitative PCR: Principles, approaches, and laboratory aspects. LEUKEMIA, 17(6), 1013-1034 [10.1038/sj.leu.2402922].
van der Velden, V; Hochhaus, A; Cazzaniga, G; Szczepanski, T; Gabert, J; van Dongen, J
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/363126
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