Cooperation triggers expectations on our partners' contributions to achieve a common goal. A partner, however, may sometimes violate such expectations, driving us to perform immediate adjustments. What neurophysiological mechanisms support these adaptations? We tested the hypothesis of an interaction-specific brain system that can decode a partner's error and promote adaptive responses when cooperating toward a shared goal. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, the participants played short melodies with a virtual partner by performing one note each in turn-taking. A colored cue indicated which melody they had to execute at each trial, thus generating expectations on what notes the partner would play. The participants also performed the task in a perceptually matched Non-Interactive context. The results showed that task interactivity modulates the brain responses to a partner's error in dorsal fronto-temporoparietal and medial cingulo-opercular networks. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that these neural activations reflect deep decoding of the partner's mistake. Within these networks, the automatic tendency to correct the partner's errors, as indexed by specific reaction times adaptations, depended on the activity of a right-lateralized fronto-opercular system that may enable mutual support during real-life cooperation. Future studies may unveil the role of this putative "interaction monitoring" brain system in social dysfunctions and their motor foundations.

Sacheli, L., Musco, M., Zazzera, E., Banfi, G., Paulesu, E. (2022). How shared goals shape action monitoring. CEREBRAL CORTEX, 32(21), 4934-4951 [10.1093/cercor/bhac019].

How shared goals shape action monitoring

Sacheli, Lucia Maria
;
Musco, Margherita Adelaide;Banfi, Giuseppe;Paulesu, Eraldo
2022

Abstract

Cooperation triggers expectations on our partners' contributions to achieve a common goal. A partner, however, may sometimes violate such expectations, driving us to perform immediate adjustments. What neurophysiological mechanisms support these adaptations? We tested the hypothesis of an interaction-specific brain system that can decode a partner's error and promote adaptive responses when cooperating toward a shared goal. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, the participants played short melodies with a virtual partner by performing one note each in turn-taking. A colored cue indicated which melody they had to execute at each trial, thus generating expectations on what notes the partner would play. The participants also performed the task in a perceptually matched Non-Interactive context. The results showed that task interactivity modulates the brain responses to a partner's error in dorsal fronto-temporoparietal and medial cingulo-opercular networks. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that these neural activations reflect deep decoding of the partner's mistake. Within these networks, the automatic tendency to correct the partner's errors, as indexed by specific reaction times adaptations, depended on the activity of a right-lateralized fronto-opercular system that may enable mutual support during real-life cooperation. Future studies may unveil the role of this putative "interaction monitoring" brain system in social dysfunctions and their motor foundations.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
error monitoring; functional MRI; mutual support; shared goal; social interaction;
English
4934
4951
18
Sacheli, L., Musco, M., Zazzera, E., Banfi, G., Paulesu, E. (2022). How shared goals shape action monitoring. CEREBRAL CORTEX, 32(21), 4934-4951 [10.1093/cercor/bhac019].
Sacheli, L; Musco, M; Zazzera, E; Banfi, G; Paulesu, E
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2022_Sacheli_HowSharedGoalsShapeActionMonitoring.pdf

Solo gestori archivio

Tipologia di allegato: Publisher’s Version (Version of Record, VoR)
Dimensione 1.12 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.12 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/362040
Citazioni
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
Social impact