Religious rituals that are painful or highly stressful are hypothesized to be costly signs of commitment essential for the evolution of complex society. Yet few studies have investigated how such extreme ritual practices were culturally transmitted in past societies. Here, we report the first study to analyze temporal and spatial variation in bloodletting rituals recorded in Classic Maya (ca. 250-900 CE) hieroglyphic texts. We also identify the sociopolitical contexts most closely associated with these ancient recorded rituals. Sampling an extensive record of 2,480 hieroglyphic texts, this study identifies every recorded instance of the logographic sign for the word ch'ahb' that is associated with ritual bloodletting. We show that documented rituals exhibit low frequency whose occurrence cannot be predicted by spatial location. Conversely, network ties better capture the distribution of bloodletting rituals across the southern Maya region. Our results indicate that bloodletting rituals by Maya nobles were not uniformly recorded, but were typically documented in association with antagonistic statements and may have signaled royal commitments among connected polities.

Munson, J., Amati, V., Macri, M., Collard, M. (2014). Classic Maya bloodletting and the cultural evolution of religious rituals: Quantifying patterns of variation in hieroglyphic texts. PLOS ONE, 9(9) [10.1371/journal.pone.0107982].

Classic Maya bloodletting and the cultural evolution of religious rituals: Quantifying patterns of variation in hieroglyphic texts

Amati V;
2014

Abstract

Religious rituals that are painful or highly stressful are hypothesized to be costly signs of commitment essential for the evolution of complex society. Yet few studies have investigated how such extreme ritual practices were culturally transmitted in past societies. Here, we report the first study to analyze temporal and spatial variation in bloodletting rituals recorded in Classic Maya (ca. 250-900 CE) hieroglyphic texts. We also identify the sociopolitical contexts most closely associated with these ancient recorded rituals. Sampling an extensive record of 2,480 hieroglyphic texts, this study identifies every recorded instance of the logographic sign for the word ch'ahb' that is associated with ritual bloodletting. We show that documented rituals exhibit low frequency whose occurrence cannot be predicted by spatial location. Conversely, network ties better capture the distribution of bloodletting rituals across the southern Maya region. Our results indicate that bloodletting rituals by Maya nobles were not uniformly recorded, but were typically documented in association with antagonistic statements and may have signaled royal commitments among connected polities.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
bloodletting rituals; Classic Maya hieroglyphic texts; generalized linear mixed models; networks;
English
Munson, J., Amati, V., Macri, M., Collard, M. (2014). Classic Maya bloodletting and the cultural evolution of religious rituals: Quantifying patterns of variation in hieroglyphic texts. PLOS ONE, 9(9) [10.1371/journal.pone.0107982].
Munson, J; Amati, V; Macri, M; Collard, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/361135
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