This work investigated the effect of Zn excess on growth, metal accumulation and photosynthetic changes in Tetradenia riparia, in relation to possible variations in the composition of the plant volatilome. Experiments were carried out in hydroponics exposing plants to a range of Zn concentrations. Zinc excess negatively affected plant growth in a dose-dependent manner. The metal was accumulated proportionally to its concentration in the medium and preferentially allocated to roots. All the photosynthetic parameters and the concentration of some photosynthetic pigments were negatively affected by Zn, whereas the level of leaf total soluble sugars remained unchanged. Twenty-three different VOCs were identified in the plant volatilome. Each compound was emitted at a different level and intensity of emission was manifold increased by the presence of Zn in the growth medium. The Zn-induced compounds could represent both an adaptive response (f.i. methanol, acetylene, C6-aldehydes, isoprene, terpenes) and a damage by-product (f.i. propanal, acetaldehyde, alkyl fragments) of the metal presence in the culture medium. Given that the Zn-mediated induction of those VOCs, considered protective, occurred even under a Zn-limited photosynthetic capacity, our work supports the hypothesis of an active role of such molecules in an adaptive plant response to trace metal stress.

Bibbiani, S., Colzi, I., Taiti, C., Guidi Nissim, W., Papini, A., Mancuso, S., et al. (2018). Smelling the metal: Volatile organic compound emission under Zn excess in the mint Tetradenia riparia. PLANT SCIENCE, 271, 1-8 [10.1016/j.plantsci.2018.03.006].

Smelling the metal: Volatile organic compound emission under Zn excess in the mint Tetradenia riparia

Guidi Nissim, Werther
;
2018

Abstract

This work investigated the effect of Zn excess on growth, metal accumulation and photosynthetic changes in Tetradenia riparia, in relation to possible variations in the composition of the plant volatilome. Experiments were carried out in hydroponics exposing plants to a range of Zn concentrations. Zinc excess negatively affected plant growth in a dose-dependent manner. The metal was accumulated proportionally to its concentration in the medium and preferentially allocated to roots. All the photosynthetic parameters and the concentration of some photosynthetic pigments were negatively affected by Zn, whereas the level of leaf total soluble sugars remained unchanged. Twenty-three different VOCs were identified in the plant volatilome. Each compound was emitted at a different level and intensity of emission was manifold increased by the presence of Zn in the growth medium. The Zn-induced compounds could represent both an adaptive response (f.i. methanol, acetylene, C6-aldehydes, isoprene, terpenes) and a damage by-product (f.i. propanal, acetaldehyde, alkyl fragments) of the metal presence in the culture medium. Given that the Zn-mediated induction of those VOCs, considered protective, occurred even under a Zn-limited photosynthetic capacity, our work supports the hypothesis of an active role of such molecules in an adaptive plant response to trace metal stress.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Medicinal plant; Photosynthetic parameters; Tetradenia riparia; Volatile organic compounds; Zn stress;
English
1
8
8
Bibbiani, S., Colzi, I., Taiti, C., Guidi Nissim, W., Papini, A., Mancuso, S., et al. (2018). Smelling the metal: Volatile organic compound emission under Zn excess in the mint Tetradenia riparia. PLANT SCIENCE, 271, 1-8 [10.1016/j.plantsci.2018.03.006].
Bibbiani, S; Colzi, I; Taiti, C; Guidi Nissim, W; Papini, A; Mancuso, S; Gonnelli, C
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
plant science 2018.pdf

Solo gestori archivio

Dimensione 316.85 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
316.85 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/358950
Citazioni
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 5
Social impact