Purpose of Review: To examine published and unpublished data collected in the context of the Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate E Loro Associazioni (PAMELA) study on the relationships between serum uric acid (SUA), office and out-of-office blood pressure (BP), and organ damage. Recent Findings: SUA values were directly and significantly related to a large number of covariates that participate at cardiovascular risk determination, such as blood glucose, total serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides, body mass index, and serum creatinine. Additional variables included echocardiographically-determined left ventricular mass index and BP values, the latter not just when measured in the office but also when evaluated at home or over the 24-h period. White-coat hypertension and masked hypertension were characterized, as sustained hypertension, by a significant increase in SUA levels, which were also directly related to different indices of 24-h BP variability. No substantial difference in SUA levels was found when data were analyzed according to the dipping or non-dipping nocturnal BP profile. Summary: Data collected in the frame of the PAMELA study document the presence of a close relationship between SUA levels and BP values independently on the hypertensive phenotype patterns of BP increase (office, 24 h, or both) and nighttime BP profile. They also document the increase in SUA as a potential factor favoring the occurrence of new hypertension and new left ventricular hypertrophy.

Grassi, G., Vanoli, J., Facchetti, R., Mancia, G. (2022). Uric Acid, Hypertensive Phenotypes, and Organ Damage: Data from the Pamela Study. CURRENT HYPERTENSION REPORTS, 24(2 (February 2022)), 29-35 [10.1007/s11906-022-01174-9].

Uric Acid, Hypertensive Phenotypes, and Organ Damage: Data from the Pamela Study

Grassi G.
Primo
;
Vanoli J.
Secondo
;
Facchetti R.
Penultimo
;
Mancia G.
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Purpose of Review: To examine published and unpublished data collected in the context of the Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate E Loro Associazioni (PAMELA) study on the relationships between serum uric acid (SUA), office and out-of-office blood pressure (BP), and organ damage. Recent Findings: SUA values were directly and significantly related to a large number of covariates that participate at cardiovascular risk determination, such as blood glucose, total serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides, body mass index, and serum creatinine. Additional variables included echocardiographically-determined left ventricular mass index and BP values, the latter not just when measured in the office but also when evaluated at home or over the 24-h period. White-coat hypertension and masked hypertension were characterized, as sustained hypertension, by a significant increase in SUA levels, which were also directly related to different indices of 24-h BP variability. No substantial difference in SUA levels was found when data were analyzed according to the dipping or non-dipping nocturnal BP profile. Summary: Data collected in the frame of the PAMELA study document the presence of a close relationship between SUA levels and BP values independently on the hypertensive phenotype patterns of BP increase (office, 24 h, or both) and nighttime BP profile. They also document the increase in SUA as a potential factor favoring the occurrence of new hypertension and new left ventricular hypertrophy.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Ambulatory blood pressure; Blood pressure variability; Cardiovascular risk; Home blood pressure; Office blood pressure; Organ damage; Uric acid;
English
29
35
7
Grassi, G., Vanoli, J., Facchetti, R., Mancia, G. (2022). Uric Acid, Hypertensive Phenotypes, and Organ Damage: Data from the Pamela Study. CURRENT HYPERTENSION REPORTS, 24(2 (February 2022)), 29-35 [10.1007/s11906-022-01174-9].
Grassi, G; Vanoli, J; Facchetti, R; Mancia, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/354367
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