Purpose of reviewTo highlight recent findings on the evaluation and impact of frailty in the management of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI).Recent findingsFrailty is not a direct natural consequence of aging. Rather, it commonly results from the intersection of age-related decline with chronic diseases and conditions. It is associated with adverse outcomes such as institutionalization, falls, and worsening health status. Growing evidence suggests that frailty should be a key consideration both in care planning and in adverse outcome prevention. The prevalence of elderly patients with TBI is increasing, and low-energy trauma (i.e., ground or low-level falls, which are typical in frail patients) is the major cause. Establishing the real incidence of frailty in TBI requires further studies. Failure to detect frailty potentially exposes patients to interventions that may not benefit them, and may even harm them. Moreover, considering patients as 'nonfrail' purely on the basis of their age is unacceptable. The future challenge is to shift to a new clinical paradigm characterized by more appropriate, goal-directed care of frail patients.SummaryThe current review highlights the crucial importance of frailty evaluation in TBI, also given the changing epidemiology of this condition. To ensure adequate assessment, prevention and management, both in and outside hospital, there is an urgent need for a valid screening tool and a specific frailty-based and comorbidity-based clinical approach.

Baggiani, M., Guglielmi, A., Citerio, G. (2022). Acute traumatic brain injury in frail patients. CURRENT OPINION IN CRITICAL CARE, 28(2), 166-175 [10.1097/MCC.0000000000000915].

Acute traumatic brain injury in frail patients

Citerio, Giuseppe
2022

Abstract

Purpose of reviewTo highlight recent findings on the evaluation and impact of frailty in the management of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI).Recent findingsFrailty is not a direct natural consequence of aging. Rather, it commonly results from the intersection of age-related decline with chronic diseases and conditions. It is associated with adverse outcomes such as institutionalization, falls, and worsening health status. Growing evidence suggests that frailty should be a key consideration both in care planning and in adverse outcome prevention. The prevalence of elderly patients with TBI is increasing, and low-energy trauma (i.e., ground or low-level falls, which are typical in frail patients) is the major cause. Establishing the real incidence of frailty in TBI requires further studies. Failure to detect frailty potentially exposes patients to interventions that may not benefit them, and may even harm them. Moreover, considering patients as 'nonfrail' purely on the basis of their age is unacceptable. The future challenge is to shift to a new clinical paradigm characterized by more appropriate, goal-directed care of frail patients.SummaryThe current review highlights the crucial importance of frailty evaluation in TBI, also given the changing epidemiology of this condition. To ensure adequate assessment, prevention and management, both in and outside hospital, there is an urgent need for a valid screening tool and a specific frailty-based and comorbidity-based clinical approach.
Articolo in rivista - Review Essay
brain injury; elderly; falls; frailty;
English
166
175
10
Baggiani, M., Guglielmi, A., Citerio, G. (2022). Acute traumatic brain injury in frail patients. CURRENT OPINION IN CRITICAL CARE, 28(2), 166-175 [10.1097/MCC.0000000000000915].
Baggiani, M; Guglielmi, A; Citerio, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/347898
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