Objective: Patients with epilepsy are at risk for several lifetime problems, in which neuropsychological impairments may represent an impacting factor. We evaluated the neuropsychological functions in children suffering from three main epilepsy categories. Further, we analyzed the longitudinal evolution of the neuropsychological profile over time. Methods: Patients undergoing neuropsychological evaluation at our Department from 2012 to 2018 were identified retrospectively. We selected patients aged 6-16 years and with at least two evaluations. Three epilepsy categories were considered: Focal/structural, focal self-limited, and idiopathic generalized. Each evaluation included the same structured assessment of main neuropsychological domains. The effect of the epilepsy category, illness duration, seizure status, and medication was computed in multilevel models. Results: We identified 103 patients (focal self-limited = 27; focal/structural = 51; and idiopathic generalized = 25), for 233 evaluations. The majority of deficits were reported in attention and executive functions (30% of patients); the results were dichotomized to obtain global indexes. Multilevel models showed a trend toward statistical significance of category of epilepsy on the global executive index and of illness duration on global attention index. Illness duration predicted the scores of executive and attention tasks, while category and medication predicted executive task performance. Focal/structural epilepsies mostly affected the executive domain, with deficits persisting over time. By contrast, an ameliorative effect of illness duration for attention was documented in all epilepsies. Conclusions: This study offers lacking information about the evolution of deficits in time, the role of epilepsy category, and possible psychological implications for high-order cognitive skills, central in several social and academic problems.

Cainelli, E., Favaro, J., De Carli, P., Luisi, C., Simonelli, A., Vecchi, M., et al. (2021). Executive Functions and Attention in Childhood Epilepsies: A Neuropsychological Hallmark of Dysfunction?. JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY, 27(7), 673-685 [10.1017/S1355617720001125].

Executive Functions and Attention in Childhood Epilepsies: A Neuropsychological Hallmark of Dysfunction?

De Carli P.;
2021

Abstract

Objective: Patients with epilepsy are at risk for several lifetime problems, in which neuropsychological impairments may represent an impacting factor. We evaluated the neuropsychological functions in children suffering from three main epilepsy categories. Further, we analyzed the longitudinal evolution of the neuropsychological profile over time. Methods: Patients undergoing neuropsychological evaluation at our Department from 2012 to 2018 were identified retrospectively. We selected patients aged 6-16 years and with at least two evaluations. Three epilepsy categories were considered: Focal/structural, focal self-limited, and idiopathic generalized. Each evaluation included the same structured assessment of main neuropsychological domains. The effect of the epilepsy category, illness duration, seizure status, and medication was computed in multilevel models. Results: We identified 103 patients (focal self-limited = 27; focal/structural = 51; and idiopathic generalized = 25), for 233 evaluations. The majority of deficits were reported in attention and executive functions (30% of patients); the results were dichotomized to obtain global indexes. Multilevel models showed a trend toward statistical significance of category of epilepsy on the global executive index and of illness duration on global attention index. Illness duration predicted the scores of executive and attention tasks, while category and medication predicted executive task performance. Focal/structural epilepsies mostly affected the executive domain, with deficits persisting over time. By contrast, an ameliorative effect of illness duration for attention was documented in all epilepsies. Conclusions: This study offers lacking information about the evolution of deficits in time, the role of epilepsy category, and possible psychological implications for high-order cognitive skills, central in several social and academic problems.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Epilepsy; Focal; Generalized; Impairments; Neurocognitive; Self-limited;
English
Cainelli, E., Favaro, J., De Carli, P., Luisi, C., Simonelli, A., Vecchi, M., et al. (2021). Executive Functions and Attention in Childhood Epilepsies: A Neuropsychological Hallmark of Dysfunction?. JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY, 27(7), 673-685 [10.1017/S1355617720001125].
Cainelli, E; Favaro, J; De Carli, P; Luisi, C; Simonelli, A; Vecchi, M; Sartori, S; Boniver, C
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/340505
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