Healthcare students (HCSs) represent a target category for seasonal flu vaccination. This study aimed to examine adherence to flu vaccination campaigns from 2016 to 2019 among HCSs and to investigate knowledge and perception of and attitude toward influenza and flu vaccination. This cross-sectional study was conducted among the HCSs of a northern Italian university. Data on adherence, knowledge, perception, and attitude were investigated through an anonymous online self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire was filled out by 352 out of 392 third-year HCSs (response rate = 90%). The main reason for refusal was the perception of influenza as non-threatening (24.4%), while self-protection was the main reason for adherence (87.5%). A univariate logistic regression analysis revealed some statistically significant associations with the adherence to the 2018–2019 campaign: being a nursing/midwifery student (OR: 4.14; 95% CI: 1.77–9.71) and agreeing with (OR: 19.28; 95% CI: 2.47–146.85) or being undecided (OR: 10.81; 95% CI: 1.33–88.27) about the obligation of vaccination in health facilities. The associations were also evaluated with a multiple logistic regression model. Despite the low vaccine uptake, good knowledge of the risks for HCSs and patients related to flu has emerged. Improving promotion strategies will be necessary to increase the adhesion of future healthcare workers.

Chittano Congedo, E., Paladino, M., Riva, M., & Belingheri, M. (2021). Adherence, Perception of, and Attitude toward Influenza and Flu Vaccination: A Cross-Sectional Study among a Population of Future Healthcare Workers. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 18(24) [10.3390/ijerph182413086].

Adherence, perception of, and attitude toward influenza and flu vaccination: A cross-sectional study among a population of future healthcare workers

Paladino, Maria Emilia
Secondo
;
Riva, Michele Augusto
Penultimo
;
Belingheri, Michael
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Healthcare students (HCSs) represent a target category for seasonal flu vaccination. This study aimed to examine adherence to flu vaccination campaigns from 2016 to 2019 among HCSs and to investigate knowledge and perception of and attitude toward influenza and flu vaccination. This cross-sectional study was conducted among the HCSs of a northern Italian university. Data on adherence, knowledge, perception, and attitude were investigated through an anonymous online self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire was filled out by 352 out of 392 third-year HCSs (response rate = 90%). The main reason for refusal was the perception of influenza as non-threatening (24.4%), while self-protection was the main reason for adherence (87.5%). A univariate logistic regression analysis revealed some statistically significant associations with the adherence to the 2018–2019 campaign: being a nursing/midwifery student (OR: 4.14; 95% CI: 1.77–9.71) and agreeing with (OR: 19.28; 95% CI: 2.47–146.85) or being undecided (OR: 10.81; 95% CI: 1.33–88.27) about the obligation of vaccination in health facilities. The associations were also evaluated with a multiple logistic regression model. Despite the low vaccine uptake, good knowledge of the risks for HCSs and patients related to flu has emerged. Improving promotion strategies will be necessary to increase the adhesion of future healthcare workers.
No
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Flu vaccination campaign; Healthcare students; Healthcare workers; Influenza vaccine; Occupational medicine;
English
Chittano Congedo, E., Paladino, M., Riva, M., & Belingheri, M. (2021). Adherence, Perception of, and Attitude toward Influenza and Flu Vaccination: A Cross-Sectional Study among a Population of Future Healthcare Workers. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 18(24) [10.3390/ijerph182413086].
Chittano Congedo, E; Paladino, M; Riva, M; Belingheri, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/339788
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