Cadmium is a widespread pollutant, which easily accumulates inside the human body with an estimated half-life of 25–30 years. Many data strongly suggest that it may play a role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper we investigated cadmium effect on human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells metabolism. Results showed that, although SH-SY5Y cells already showed hyperactivated glycolysis, cadmium further increased basal glycolytic rate. Both glycolytic capacity and reserve were also increased following cadmium administration, endowing the cells with a higher compensatory glycolysis when oxidative phosphorylation was inhibited. Cadmium administration also led to an increase in glycolytic ATP production rate, paralleled by a decrease in ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation, due to an impairment of mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, following cadmium administration, mitochondria increased their dependency on glutamine, while decreasing lipids oxidation. On the whole, our data show that cadmium exacerbates the Warburg effect and promotes the use of glutamine as a substrate for lipid biosynthesis. Although increased glutamine consumption leads to an increase in glutathione level, this cannot efficiently counteract cadmium-induced oxidative stress, leading to membrane lipid peroxidation. Oxidative stress represents a serious threat for neuronal cells and our data confirm glutathione as a key defense mechanism.

Bovio, F., Melchioretto, P., Forcella, M., Fusi, P., & Urani, C. (2021). Cadmium promotes glycolysis upregulation and glutamine dependency in human neuronal cells. NEUROCHEMISTRY INTERNATIONAL, 149(October 2021) [10.1016/j.neuint.2021.105144].

Cadmium promotes glycolysis upregulation and glutamine dependency in human neuronal cells

Bovio, Federica
Primo
;
Melchioretto, Pasquale;Forcella, Matilde;Fusi, Paola;Urani, Chiara
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Cadmium is a widespread pollutant, which easily accumulates inside the human body with an estimated half-life of 25–30 years. Many data strongly suggest that it may play a role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper we investigated cadmium effect on human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells metabolism. Results showed that, although SH-SY5Y cells already showed hyperactivated glycolysis, cadmium further increased basal glycolytic rate. Both glycolytic capacity and reserve were also increased following cadmium administration, endowing the cells with a higher compensatory glycolysis when oxidative phosphorylation was inhibited. Cadmium administration also led to an increase in glycolytic ATP production rate, paralleled by a decrease in ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation, due to an impairment of mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, following cadmium administration, mitochondria increased their dependency on glutamine, while decreasing lipids oxidation. On the whole, our data show that cadmium exacerbates the Warburg effect and promotes the use of glutamine as a substrate for lipid biosynthesis. Although increased glutamine consumption leads to an increase in glutathione level, this cannot efficiently counteract cadmium-induced oxidative stress, leading to membrane lipid peroxidation. Oxidative stress represents a serious threat for neuronal cells and our data confirm glutathione as a key defense mechanism.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Cadmium; Energy metabolism; Glutamine; Glutathione; Oxidative stress; SH-SY5Y neuronal cells;
English
Bovio, F., Melchioretto, P., Forcella, M., Fusi, P., & Urani, C. (2021). Cadmium promotes glycolysis upregulation and glutamine dependency in human neuronal cells. NEUROCHEMISTRY INTERNATIONAL, 149(October 2021) [10.1016/j.neuint.2021.105144].
Bovio, F; Melchioretto, P; Forcella, M; Fusi, P; Urani, C
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/321323
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