The relationship between childhood leukemia and prenatal exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation remains debatable. This population-based case-control study investigated the association between prenatal exposure to diagnostic X-ray examinations (for different types of examinations and at different stages of pregnancy) and the risk of childhood lymphatic and myeloid leukemia. All children born and diagnosed with leukemia between 1973-1989 in Sweden (578 lymphatic and 74 myeloid) were selected as cases, and each was matched (by sex and year of birth) to a healthy control child (excluding Down's syndrome). Exposure data were abstracted blindly from all available medical records. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by conditional logistic regression. It was found that prenatal X-ray examinations resulting in direct fetal exposure were not associated with a significant overall increased risk for childhood leukemia (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.83-1.47), for lymphatic leukemia (OR = 1.04, 95% CI 0.77-1.40), or for myeloid leukemia (OR = 1.49, 95% CI 0.48-4.72). There was little evidence of a dose response or variation in risk by trimester of exposure or age at diagnosis. Thus X-ray examinations performed during pregnancy in the 1970s and 1980s in Sweden did not affect the risk of childhood leukemia discernibly.

Naumburg, E., Bellocco, R., Cnattingius, S., Hall, P., Boice, J., & Ekbom, A. (2001). Intrauterine exposure to diagnostic X rays and risk of childhood leukemia subtypes. RADIATION RESEARCH, 156(6), 718-23.

Intrauterine exposure to diagnostic X rays and risk of childhood leukemia subtypes

BELLOCCO, RINO;
2001

Abstract

The relationship between childhood leukemia and prenatal exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation remains debatable. This population-based case-control study investigated the association between prenatal exposure to diagnostic X-ray examinations (for different types of examinations and at different stages of pregnancy) and the risk of childhood lymphatic and myeloid leukemia. All children born and diagnosed with leukemia between 1973-1989 in Sweden (578 lymphatic and 74 myeloid) were selected as cases, and each was matched (by sex and year of birth) to a healthy control child (excluding Down's syndrome). Exposure data were abstracted blindly from all available medical records. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by conditional logistic regression. It was found that prenatal X-ray examinations resulting in direct fetal exposure were not associated with a significant overall increased risk for childhood leukemia (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.83-1.47), for lymphatic leukemia (OR = 1.04, 95% CI 0.77-1.40), or for myeloid leukemia (OR = 1.49, 95% CI 0.48-4.72). There was little evidence of a dose response or variation in risk by trimester of exposure or age at diagnosis. Thus X-ray examinations performed during pregnancy in the 1970s and 1980s in Sweden did not affect the risk of childhood leukemia discernibly.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Infant; Leukemia, Lymphoid; X-Rays; Humans; Leukemia, Radiation-Induced; Child; Leukemia, Myeloid; Adolescent; Female; Maternal Exposure; Risk Assessment; Child, Preschool
English
718-23
Naumburg, E., Bellocco, R., Cnattingius, S., Hall, P., Boice, J., & Ekbom, A. (2001). Intrauterine exposure to diagnostic X rays and risk of childhood leukemia subtypes. RADIATION RESEARCH, 156(6), 718-23.
Naumburg, E; Bellocco, R; Cnattingius, S; Hall, P; Boice, J; Ekbom, A
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/31688
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