Aim: To investigate the relative contribution of previous gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and current type 2 diabetes (T2D) on the development of liver fibrosis, the strongest predictor of end-stage liver disease. Methods: This is a population-based cross-sectional study based on data from the 2017–2018 cycle of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We included women age ≥ 20 years that had delivered at least one live birth and had available data on vibration-controlled transient elastography (VCTE). Liver steatosis and fibrosis were assessed by the median value of controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) and liver stiffness measurement (LSM), respectively. Results: Among the 1699 women included in the study, 144 (10.1%, 95% CI 7.7–13.2) reported a previous diagnosis of GDM. Women with previous GDM were younger, had a higher BMI, a higher prevalence of T2D and were significantly older at the time they had the last live birth. Univariate analysis did not show a significant difference between women with and without a prior history of GDM in terms of both steatosis (44.8% vs 39.4%, p = 0.464) and fibrosis (7.5% vs 7.6%, p = 0.854). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that BMI, γ-glutamyltranspeptidase levels, T2D (OR 2.96, 95% CI 1.48–5.93, p < 0.01), HBV and HCV infection were associated with higher odds of significant fibrosis, while previous GDM showed a neutral effect. Conclusions: Women with previous GDM that do not develop overt T2D might not experience a poor hepatic prognosis.

Ciardullo, S., Bianconi, E., Zerbini, F., & Perseghin, G. (2021). Current type 2 diabetes, rather than previous gestational diabetes, is associated with liver disease in U.S. women. DIABETES RESEARCH AND CLINICAL PRACTICE, 177(July 2021) [10.1016/j.diabres.2021.108879].

Current type 2 diabetes, rather than previous gestational diabetes, is associated with liver disease in U.S. women

Ciardullo, Stefano
Primo
;
Perseghin, Gianluca
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Aim: To investigate the relative contribution of previous gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and current type 2 diabetes (T2D) on the development of liver fibrosis, the strongest predictor of end-stage liver disease. Methods: This is a population-based cross-sectional study based on data from the 2017–2018 cycle of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We included women age ≥ 20 years that had delivered at least one live birth and had available data on vibration-controlled transient elastography (VCTE). Liver steatosis and fibrosis were assessed by the median value of controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) and liver stiffness measurement (LSM), respectively. Results: Among the 1699 women included in the study, 144 (10.1%, 95% CI 7.7–13.2) reported a previous diagnosis of GDM. Women with previous GDM were younger, had a higher BMI, a higher prevalence of T2D and were significantly older at the time they had the last live birth. Univariate analysis did not show a significant difference between women with and without a prior history of GDM in terms of both steatosis (44.8% vs 39.4%, p = 0.464) and fibrosis (7.5% vs 7.6%, p = 0.854). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that BMI, γ-glutamyltranspeptidase levels, T2D (OR 2.96, 95% CI 1.48–5.93, p < 0.01), HBV and HCV infection were associated with higher odds of significant fibrosis, while previous GDM showed a neutral effect. Conclusions: Women with previous GDM that do not develop overt T2D might not experience a poor hepatic prognosis.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Fibroscan; GDM; MAFLD; NAFLD; NASH; T2D;
English
Ciardullo, S., Bianconi, E., Zerbini, F., & Perseghin, G. (2021). Current type 2 diabetes, rather than previous gestational diabetes, is associated with liver disease in U.S. women. DIABETES RESEARCH AND CLINICAL PRACTICE, 177(July 2021) [10.1016/j.diabres.2021.108879].
Ciardullo, S; Bianconi, E; Zerbini, F; Perseghin, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/316322
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