Several infectious agents are ascertained causes of cancer, but the burden of cancer mortality attributable to carcinogenic infections in Italy is still unknown. To tackle this issue, we calculated the rate and regional distribution of cancer deaths due to infections sustained by seven pathogens ranked as group 1 carcinogenic agents in humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Population attributable fractions related to these agents were applied to annual statistics of cancer deaths coded according to the 10th International Classification of Diseases. The estimated burden of cancer mortality attributable to carcinogenic infections in Italy during the period 2011–2015 was 8.7% of all cancer deaths registered yearly, on average. Approximately 60% of deaths occurred in men, and almost the whole burden was due to four infectious agents (Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis C virus, high-risk human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus). The analysis of regional distribution showed a higher number of infection-related cancer deaths in the northern regions, where the estimates reached 30 (Liguria) and 28 (Friuli Venezia Giulia) deaths per 100,000 inhabitants in 2015. Since one-twelfth of cancer deaths were attributable to these modifiable risk factors, the implementation of appropriate prevention and treatment interventions may help to reduce the impact of these infections on cancer mortality.

Ferrara, P., Conti, S., Aguero, F., Albano, L., Masuet-Aumatell, C., Ramon-Torrell, J., et al. (2020). Estimates of cancer mortality attributable to carcinogenic infections in Italy. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 17(23), 1-10 [10.3390/ijerph17238723].

Estimates of cancer mortality attributable to carcinogenic infections in Italy

Ferrara P.
;
Conti S.;Mantovani L. G.
Ultimo
2020

Abstract

Several infectious agents are ascertained causes of cancer, but the burden of cancer mortality attributable to carcinogenic infections in Italy is still unknown. To tackle this issue, we calculated the rate and regional distribution of cancer deaths due to infections sustained by seven pathogens ranked as group 1 carcinogenic agents in humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Population attributable fractions related to these agents were applied to annual statistics of cancer deaths coded according to the 10th International Classification of Diseases. The estimated burden of cancer mortality attributable to carcinogenic infections in Italy during the period 2011–2015 was 8.7% of all cancer deaths registered yearly, on average. Approximately 60% of deaths occurred in men, and almost the whole burden was due to four infectious agents (Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis C virus, high-risk human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus). The analysis of regional distribution showed a higher number of infection-related cancer deaths in the northern regions, where the estimates reached 30 (Liguria) and 28 (Friuli Venezia Giulia) deaths per 100,000 inhabitants in 2015. Since one-twelfth of cancer deaths were attributable to these modifiable risk factors, the implementation of appropriate prevention and treatment interventions may help to reduce the impact of these infections on cancer mortality.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Burden of cancer mortality; Cancer epidemiology; Cancer etiology; Cancer prevention; Carcinogenic infections; Modifiable risk factors;
English
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Ferrara, P., Conti, S., Aguero, F., Albano, L., Masuet-Aumatell, C., Ramon-Torrell, J., et al. (2020). Estimates of cancer mortality attributable to carcinogenic infections in Italy. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 17(23), 1-10 [10.3390/ijerph17238723].
Ferrara, P; Conti, S; Aguero, F; Albano, L; Masuet-Aumatell, C; Ramon-Torrell, J; Mantovani, L
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/297341
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