A sound postural system requires sensorimotor integration. Evidence suggests that individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) present sensorimotor integration impairments. The Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) can be used to evaluate postural capacity assessing five physiological subsets (i.e., vision, reaction time, peripheral sensation, lower limb strength, balance); however, no studies applied the PPA in young individuals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the PPA in children and adolescents with ASD compared with age-matched typically developing (TD) individuals and examine the relationship between the PPA subset within the ASD and TD participants according to different age groups. Percentiles from the PPA were obtained from the TD children and adolescents (n = 135) for each test. Performances of the individuals with ASD (n = 18) were examined relative to the TD percentiles. ASD participants’ scores were above the 90th percentile (i.e., poor performance) in most sensory, motor and balance parameters. Performance in most of the PPA tests significantly improved with older age in the TD group but not in the ASD group. The study findings support the use of the PPA in TD children and adolescents while further research should investigate postural capacity in a larger ASD sample to enhance the understanding of sensorimotor systems contributing to compromised postural control.

Perin, C., Valagussa, G., Mazzucchelli, M., Gariboldi, V., Cerri, C., Meroni, R., et al. (2020). Physiological profile assessment of posture in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing peers. BRAIN SCIENCES, 10(10), 1-18 [10.3390/brainsci10100681].

Physiological profile assessment of posture in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing peers

Perin C.
;
Valagussa G.;Mazzucchelli M.;Gariboldi V.;Cerri C. G.;Meroni R.;Cornaggia C. M.;Piscitelli D.
2020

Abstract

A sound postural system requires sensorimotor integration. Evidence suggests that individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) present sensorimotor integration impairments. The Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) can be used to evaluate postural capacity assessing five physiological subsets (i.e., vision, reaction time, peripheral sensation, lower limb strength, balance); however, no studies applied the PPA in young individuals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the PPA in children and adolescents with ASD compared with age-matched typically developing (TD) individuals and examine the relationship between the PPA subset within the ASD and TD participants according to different age groups. Percentiles from the PPA were obtained from the TD children and adolescents (n = 135) for each test. Performances of the individuals with ASD (n = 18) were examined relative to the TD percentiles. ASD participants’ scores were above the 90th percentile (i.e., poor performance) in most sensory, motor and balance parameters. Performance in most of the PPA tests significantly improved with older age in the TD group but not in the ASD group. The study findings support the use of the PPA in TD children and adolescents while further research should investigate postural capacity in a larger ASD sample to enhance the understanding of sensorimotor systems contributing to compromised postural control.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Assessment; Autism spectrum disorder; Neurodevelopmental disorders; Postural balance; Sensorimotor integration
English
2020
10
10
1
18
681
none
Perin, C., Valagussa, G., Mazzucchelli, M., Gariboldi, V., Cerri, C., Meroni, R., et al. (2020). Physiological profile assessment of posture in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing peers. BRAIN SCIENCES, 10(10), 1-18 [10.3390/brainsci10100681].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/292438
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