The Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage was adopted within the framework of UNESCO in October 2003. Article 2 of the Convention establishes that intangible cultural heritage (ICH) must be compatible with sustainable development. Sustainable development consists of four intertwined dimensions: society, environment, culture and economy. This paper will focus on environmental sustainability. Chapter 6 of the Operational Directives for the Implementation of this Convention establish a framework related to ‘environmental sustainability’. The framework consists of three pillars. The first pillar relates to ‘environmental impacts in the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage’. The second pillar relates to ‘knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe’. The final pillar concerns ‘community-based resilience to natural disasters and climate change’. In line with the first and second pillar, intellectual property rights, particularly, geographical indications, support environmentally friendly practices and recognise the community as bearers of knowledge about nature and essential actors in sustaining the environment. In line with the third and final pillar, in the context of COVID-19 pandemic, UNESCO and other international organisations implemented impact-mitigating initiatives to support states and communities to safeguard their ICH and ensure its viability. Among these initiatives are those related to digitization, VR and AR, with a particular view to strengthening the role of museums as crucial cultural institutions for the safeguarding of culture and the wellbeing of society. For museums, the goal would be to render these institutions as capable of developing integrated strategies for safeguarding not only collections and tangible objects but also intangible heritage and its viability. The pandemic also shed light on the significance of ICH elements and practices that centre on preparing for, responding to and recovering from environmental, social and cultural impact of natural disasters, emergencies and conflicts. Both during and in the post-emergency phase of COVID-19, heritage-bearing communities worked to ensure environmental sustainability remained at the heart of the long-term reactivation of their traditional practices.

Ubertazzi, B., Sevagian, P. (In corso di stampa). Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage during Environmental Emergencies’. IZVESTIIA VYSSHIKH UCHEBNYKH ZAVEDENII. PRAVOVEDENIE, 1-19.

Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage during Environmental Emergencies’

Ubertazzi, B
;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

The Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage was adopted within the framework of UNESCO in October 2003. Article 2 of the Convention establishes that intangible cultural heritage (ICH) must be compatible with sustainable development. Sustainable development consists of four intertwined dimensions: society, environment, culture and economy. This paper will focus on environmental sustainability. Chapter 6 of the Operational Directives for the Implementation of this Convention establish a framework related to ‘environmental sustainability’. The framework consists of three pillars. The first pillar relates to ‘environmental impacts in the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage’. The second pillar relates to ‘knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe’. The final pillar concerns ‘community-based resilience to natural disasters and climate change’. In line with the first and second pillar, intellectual property rights, particularly, geographical indications, support environmentally friendly practices and recognise the community as bearers of knowledge about nature and essential actors in sustaining the environment. In line with the third and final pillar, in the context of COVID-19 pandemic, UNESCO and other international organisations implemented impact-mitigating initiatives to support states and communities to safeguard their ICH and ensure its viability. Among these initiatives are those related to digitization, VR and AR, with a particular view to strengthening the role of museums as crucial cultural institutions for the safeguarding of culture and the wellbeing of society. For museums, the goal would be to render these institutions as capable of developing integrated strategies for safeguarding not only collections and tangible objects but also intangible heritage and its viability. The pandemic also shed light on the significance of ICH elements and practices that centre on preparing for, responding to and recovering from environmental, social and cultural impact of natural disasters, emergencies and conflicts. Both during and in the post-emergency phase of COVID-19, heritage-bearing communities worked to ensure environmental sustainability remained at the heart of the long-term reactivation of their traditional practices.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage; Environmental Emergencies;
English
1
19
19
Ubertazzi, B., Sevagian, P. (In corso di stampa). Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage during Environmental Emergencies’. IZVESTIIA VYSSHIKH UCHEBNYKH ZAVEDENII. PRAVOVEDENIE, 1-19.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/292024
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