Editor's Perspective What We Already Know about This Topic Obesity increases the propensity to atelectasis in acute respiratory distress syndrome, but the optimal approach to reversing this atelectasis is uncertain What This Article Tells Us That Is New A clinical crossover study comparing three approaches to titrate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; according to a fixed table, according to end-expiratory esophageal pressure, and targeting the best compliance during a decremental PEEP trial) found that a recruitment maneuver followed by decremental PEEP minimized atelectasis and overdistension, and best restored compliance and oxygenation without causing hemodynamic impairment Background: Obese patients are characterized by normal chest-wall elastance and high pleural pressure and have been excluded from trials assessing best strategies to set positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The authors hypothesized that severely obese patients with ARDS present with a high degree of lung collapse, reversible by titrated PEEP preceded by a lung recruitment maneuver. Methods: Severely obese ARDS patients were enrolled in a physiologic crossover study evaluating the effects of three PEEP titration strategies applied in the following order: (1) PEEPARDSNET: the low PEEP/Fio2 ARDSnet table; (2) PEEPINCREMENTAL: PEEP levels set to determine a positive end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure; and (3) PEEPDECREMENTAL: PEEP levels set to determine the lowest respiratory system elastance during a decremental PEEP trial following a recruitment maneuver on respiratory mechanics, regional lung collapse, and overdistension according to electrical impedance tomography and gas exchange. Results: Fourteen patients underwent the study procedures. At PEEPARDSNET (13 ± 1 cm H2O) end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure was negative (-5 ± 5 cm H2O), lung elastance was 27 ± 12 cm H2O/L, and PaO2/Fio2 was 194 ± 111 mmHg. Compared to PEEPARDSNET, at PEEPINCREMENTAL level (22 ± 3 cm H2O) lung volume increased (977 ± 708 ml), lung elastance decreased (23 ± 7 cm H2O/l), lung collapse decreased (18 ± 10%), and ventilation homogeneity increased thus rising oxygenation (251 ± 105 mmHg), despite higher overdistension levels (16 ± 12%), all values P < 0.05 versus PEEPARDSnet. Setting PEEP according to a PEEPDECREMENTAL trial after a recruitment maneuver (21 ± 4 cm H2O, P = 0.99 vs. PEEPINCREMENTAL) further lowered lung elastance (19 ± 6 cm H2O/l) and increased oxygenation (329 ± 82 mmHg) while reducing lung collapse (9 ± 2%) and overdistension (11 ± 2%), all values P < 0.05 versus PEEPARDSnet and PEEPINCREMENTAL. All patients were maintained on titrated PEEP levels up to 24 h without hemodynamic or ventilation related complications. Conclusions: Among the PEEP titration strategies tested, setting PEEP according to a PEEPDECREMENTAL trial preceded by a recruitment maneuver obtained the best lung function by decreasing lung overdistension and collapse, restoring lung elastance, and oxygenation suggesting lung tissue recruitment.

Fumagalli, J., Santiago, R., Teggia Droghi, M., Zhang, C., Fintelmann, F., Troschel, F., et al. (2019). Lung Recruitment in Obese Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. ANESTHESIOLOGY, 130(5), 791-803 [10.1097/ALN.0000000000002638].

Lung Recruitment in Obese Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Teggia Droghi M.;Rezoagli E.;
2019

Abstract

Editor's Perspective What We Already Know about This Topic Obesity increases the propensity to atelectasis in acute respiratory distress syndrome, but the optimal approach to reversing this atelectasis is uncertain What This Article Tells Us That Is New A clinical crossover study comparing three approaches to titrate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; according to a fixed table, according to end-expiratory esophageal pressure, and targeting the best compliance during a decremental PEEP trial) found that a recruitment maneuver followed by decremental PEEP minimized atelectasis and overdistension, and best restored compliance and oxygenation without causing hemodynamic impairment Background: Obese patients are characterized by normal chest-wall elastance and high pleural pressure and have been excluded from trials assessing best strategies to set positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The authors hypothesized that severely obese patients with ARDS present with a high degree of lung collapse, reversible by titrated PEEP preceded by a lung recruitment maneuver. Methods: Severely obese ARDS patients were enrolled in a physiologic crossover study evaluating the effects of three PEEP titration strategies applied in the following order: (1) PEEPARDSNET: the low PEEP/Fio2 ARDSnet table; (2) PEEPINCREMENTAL: PEEP levels set to determine a positive end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure; and (3) PEEPDECREMENTAL: PEEP levels set to determine the lowest respiratory system elastance during a decremental PEEP trial following a recruitment maneuver on respiratory mechanics, regional lung collapse, and overdistension according to electrical impedance tomography and gas exchange. Results: Fourteen patients underwent the study procedures. At PEEPARDSNET (13 ± 1 cm H2O) end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure was negative (-5 ± 5 cm H2O), lung elastance was 27 ± 12 cm H2O/L, and PaO2/Fio2 was 194 ± 111 mmHg. Compared to PEEPARDSNET, at PEEPINCREMENTAL level (22 ± 3 cm H2O) lung volume increased (977 ± 708 ml), lung elastance decreased (23 ± 7 cm H2O/l), lung collapse decreased (18 ± 10%), and ventilation homogeneity increased thus rising oxygenation (251 ± 105 mmHg), despite higher overdistension levels (16 ± 12%), all values P < 0.05 versus PEEPARDSnet. Setting PEEP according to a PEEPDECREMENTAL trial after a recruitment maneuver (21 ± 4 cm H2O, P = 0.99 vs. PEEPINCREMENTAL) further lowered lung elastance (19 ± 6 cm H2O/l) and increased oxygenation (329 ± 82 mmHg) while reducing lung collapse (9 ± 2%) and overdistension (11 ± 2%), all values P < 0.05 versus PEEPARDSnet and PEEPINCREMENTAL. All patients were maintained on titrated PEEP levels up to 24 h without hemodynamic or ventilation related complications. Conclusions: Among the PEEP titration strategies tested, setting PEEP according to a PEEPDECREMENTAL trial preceded by a recruitment maneuver obtained the best lung function by decreasing lung overdistension and collapse, restoring lung elastance, and oxygenation suggesting lung tissue recruitment.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Adult; Aged; Cross-Over Studies; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Obesity; Positive-Pressure Respiration; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult; Respiratory Mechanics
English
2019
130
5
791
803
reserved
Fumagalli, J., Santiago, R., Teggia Droghi, M., Zhang, C., Fintelmann, F., Troschel, F., et al. (2019). Lung Recruitment in Obese Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. ANESTHESIOLOGY, 130(5), 791-803 [10.1097/ALN.0000000000002638].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/287189
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