OBJECTIVES: Thrombocytopenia is a hallmark for patients with cirrhosis and it is perceived as a risk factor for bleeding events. However, the relationship between platelet count and bleeding is still unclear. METHODS: We investigated the relationship between platelet count and major or clinical relevant nonmajor bleedings during a follow-up of ∼4 years. RESULTS: A total of 280 cirrhotic patients with different degrees of liver disease (67% males; age 64±37 years; 47% Child–Pugh B and C) were followed up for a median of 1,129 (interquartile range: 800–1,498) days yielding 953.12 patient-year of observation. The annual rate of any significant bleeding was 5.45%/year (3.57%/year and 1.89%/year for major and minor bleeding, respectively). Fifty-two (18.6%) patients experienced a major (n=34) or minor (n=18) bleeding event, predominantly from gastrointestinal origin. Platelet counts progressively decreased with the worsening of liver disease and were similar in patients with or without major or minor bleeding: a platelet count ≤50×103/μl was detected in 3 (6%) patients with and in 20 (9%) patients without any bleeding event. Conversely, prothrombin time-international normalized ratio was slightly higher in patients with overall or major bleeding. On Cox proportional hazard analysis, only a previous gastrointestinal bleeding (hazard ratio (HR): 1.96; 95% confidence interval: 1.11–3.47; P=0.020) and encephalopathy (HR: 2.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.16–3.62; P=0.013) independently predicted overall bleeding events. CONCLUSIONS: Platelet count does not predict unprovoked major or minor bleeding in cirrhotic patients.

Basili, S., Raparelli, V., Napoleone, L., Talerico, G., Corazza, G., Perticone, F., et al. (2018). Platelet count does not predict bleeding in cirrhotic patients: Results from the PRO-LIVER Study. THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY, 113(3), 368-375 [10.1038/ajg.2017.457].

Platelet count does not predict bleeding in cirrhotic patients: Results from the PRO-LIVER Study

Invernizzi P.;Sirico D.;
2018

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Thrombocytopenia is a hallmark for patients with cirrhosis and it is perceived as a risk factor for bleeding events. However, the relationship between platelet count and bleeding is still unclear. METHODS: We investigated the relationship between platelet count and major or clinical relevant nonmajor bleedings during a follow-up of ∼4 years. RESULTS: A total of 280 cirrhotic patients with different degrees of liver disease (67% males; age 64±37 years; 47% Child–Pugh B and C) were followed up for a median of 1,129 (interquartile range: 800–1,498) days yielding 953.12 patient-year of observation. The annual rate of any significant bleeding was 5.45%/year (3.57%/year and 1.89%/year for major and minor bleeding, respectively). Fifty-two (18.6%) patients experienced a major (n=34) or minor (n=18) bleeding event, predominantly from gastrointestinal origin. Platelet counts progressively decreased with the worsening of liver disease and were similar in patients with or without major or minor bleeding: a platelet count ≤50×103/μl was detected in 3 (6%) patients with and in 20 (9%) patients without any bleeding event. Conversely, prothrombin time-international normalized ratio was slightly higher in patients with overall or major bleeding. On Cox proportional hazard analysis, only a previous gastrointestinal bleeding (hazard ratio (HR): 1.96; 95% confidence interval: 1.11–3.47; P=0.020) and encephalopathy (HR: 2.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.16–3.62; P=0.013) independently predicted overall bleeding events. CONCLUSIONS: Platelet count does not predict unprovoked major or minor bleeding in cirrhotic patients.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
DECOMPENSATED CIRRHOSIS; COAGULATION; THROMBOSIS; THROMBOCYTOPENIA; HEMOSTASIS; HEMORRHAGE; RISK; ASSOCIATION; ENDOTOXEMIA; ACTIVATION
English
368
375
8
Basili, S., Raparelli, V., Napoleone, L., Talerico, G., Corazza, G., Perticone, F., et al. (2018). Platelet count does not predict bleeding in cirrhotic patients: Results from the PRO-LIVER Study. THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY, 113(3), 368-375 [10.1038/ajg.2017.457].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/281473
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