Recent findings suggested a role for soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides in Alzheimer's disease associated cognitive decline. We investigated the action of soluble, monomeric Abeta(1-40) on CaM kinase II, a kinase involved in neuroplasticity and cognition. We treated organotypic hippocampal cultures short-term (up to 4h) and long-term (5 days) with Abeta(1-40) (1nM-5muM). Abeta did not induce cell damage, apoptosis or synaptic loss. Short-term treatment down-regulated enzymatic activity of the kinase, by reducing its Thr(286) phosphorylation. In contrast, long-term treatment (1nM-5muM) markedly and significantly up-regulated enzymatic activity, with peak stimulation at 10nM (three-fold). Up-regulation of activity was associated with increased expression of the alpha-isoform of CaM kinase II, increased phosphorylation at Thr(286) (activator residue) and decreased phosphorylation at Thr(305-306) (inhibitory residues). We investigated the effect of glutamate on CaM kinase II following exposure to 1 or 10nM Abeta(1-40). As previously reported, glutamate increased CaM kinase II activity. However, the glutamate effect was not altered by pretreatment of slices with Abeta. Short- and long-term Abeta treatment showed opposite effects on CaM kinase II, suggesting that long-term changes are an adaptation to the kinase early down-regulation. The marked effect of Abeta(1-40) on the kinase suggests that semi-physiological and slowly raising peptide concentrations may have a significant impact on synaptic plasticity in the absence of synaptic loss or neuronal cell death.

Tardito, D., Gennarelli, M., Musazzi, L., Gesuete, R., Chiarini, S., Barbiero, V., et al. (2007). Long-term soluble Abeta(1-40) activates CaM kinase II in organotypic hippocampal cultures. NEUROBIOLOGY OF AGING, 28(9), 1388-1395 [10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2006.06.012].

Long-term soluble Abeta(1-40) activates CaM kinase II in organotypic hippocampal cultures

L. Musazzi;
2007

Abstract

Recent findings suggested a role for soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides in Alzheimer's disease associated cognitive decline. We investigated the action of soluble, monomeric Abeta(1-40) on CaM kinase II, a kinase involved in neuroplasticity and cognition. We treated organotypic hippocampal cultures short-term (up to 4h) and long-term (5 days) with Abeta(1-40) (1nM-5muM). Abeta did not induce cell damage, apoptosis or synaptic loss. Short-term treatment down-regulated enzymatic activity of the kinase, by reducing its Thr(286) phosphorylation. In contrast, long-term treatment (1nM-5muM) markedly and significantly up-regulated enzymatic activity, with peak stimulation at 10nM (three-fold). Up-regulation of activity was associated with increased expression of the alpha-isoform of CaM kinase II, increased phosphorylation at Thr(286) (activator residue) and decreased phosphorylation at Thr(305-306) (inhibitory residues). We investigated the effect of glutamate on CaM kinase II following exposure to 1 or 10nM Abeta(1-40). As previously reported, glutamate increased CaM kinase II activity. However, the glutamate effect was not altered by pretreatment of slices with Abeta. Short- and long-term Abeta treatment showed opposite effects on CaM kinase II, suggesting that long-term changes are an adaptation to the kinase early down-regulation. The marked effect of Abeta(1-40) on the kinase suggests that semi-physiological and slowly raising peptide concentrations may have a significant impact on synaptic plasticity in the absence of synaptic loss or neuronal cell death.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Alzheimer; Amyloid; CaM kinase II; Glutamate; Protein phosphorylation; Synaptic plasticity
English
1388
1395
8
Tardito, D., Gennarelli, M., Musazzi, L., Gesuete, R., Chiarini, S., Barbiero, V., et al. (2007). Long-term soluble Abeta(1-40) activates CaM kinase II in organotypic hippocampal cultures. NEUROBIOLOGY OF AGING, 28(9), 1388-1395 [10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2006.06.012].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/278433
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