Interactions between the auditory and the motor systems are critical in music as well as in other domains, such as speech. The premotor cortex, specifically the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC), seems to play a key role in auditory-motor integration, and in mapping the association between a sound and the movement used to produce it. In the present studies we tested the causal role of the dPMC in learning and applying auditory-motor associations using 1 Hz repetitive Transcranical Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS). In this paradigm, nonmusicians learn a set of auditory-motor associations through melody training in two contexts: first when the sound to key-press mapping was in a conventional sequential order (low to high tones mapped onto keys from left to right), and then when it was in a novel scrambled order. Participant's ability to match the four pitches to four computer keys was tested before and after the training. In both experiments, the group that received 1 Hz rTMS over the dPMC showed no significant improvement on the pitch-matching task following training, whereas the control group (who received rTMS to visual cortex) did. Moreover, in Experiment 2 where the pitch-key mapping was novel, rTMS over the dPMC also interfered with learning. These findings suggest that rTMS over dPMC disturbs the formation of auditory-motor associations, especially when the association is novel and must be learned rather explicitly. The present results contribute to a better understanding of the role of dPMC in auditory-motor integration, suggesting a critical role of dPMC in learning the link between an action and its associated sound.

Lega, C., Stephan, M., Zatorre, R., & Penhune, V. (2016). Testing the role of dorsal premotor cortex in auditory-motor association learning using Transcranical Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). PLOS ONE, 11(9) [10.1371/journal.pone.0163380].

Testing the role of dorsal premotor cortex in auditory-motor association learning using Transcranical Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)

Lega C.
;
2016

Abstract

Interactions between the auditory and the motor systems are critical in music as well as in other domains, such as speech. The premotor cortex, specifically the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC), seems to play a key role in auditory-motor integration, and in mapping the association between a sound and the movement used to produce it. In the present studies we tested the causal role of the dPMC in learning and applying auditory-motor associations using 1 Hz repetitive Transcranical Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS). In this paradigm, nonmusicians learn a set of auditory-motor associations through melody training in two contexts: first when the sound to key-press mapping was in a conventional sequential order (low to high tones mapped onto keys from left to right), and then when it was in a novel scrambled order. Participant's ability to match the four pitches to four computer keys was tested before and after the training. In both experiments, the group that received 1 Hz rTMS over the dPMC showed no significant improvement on the pitch-matching task following training, whereas the control group (who received rTMS to visual cortex) did. Moreover, in Experiment 2 where the pitch-key mapping was novel, rTMS over the dPMC also interfered with learning. These findings suggest that rTMS over dPMC disturbs the formation of auditory-motor associations, especially when the association is novel and must be learned rather explicitly. The present results contribute to a better understanding of the role of dPMC in auditory-motor integration, suggesting a critical role of dPMC in learning the link between an action and its associated sound.
Si
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Premotor cortex; Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation; Auditory-motor associations
English
Lega, C., Stephan, M., Zatorre, R., & Penhune, V. (2016). Testing the role of dorsal premotor cortex in auditory-motor association learning using Transcranical Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). PLOS ONE, 11(9) [10.1371/journal.pone.0163380].
Lega, C; Stephan, M; Zatorre, R; Penhune, V
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/276137
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