Modifying the visual aspect of a virtual arm that is felt as one's own using immersive virtual reality (VR) modifies pain threshold in healthy subjects, but does it modify pain ratings in chronic pain patients? Our aim was to investigate whether varying properties of a virtual arm co-located with the real arm modulated pain ratings in patients with chronic arm/hand pain because of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type I (without nerve injury) or peripheral nerve injury (PNI). CRPS (n = 9) and PNI (n = 10) patients were immersed in VR and the virtual arm was shown at 4 transparency levels (transparency test) and 3 sizes (size test). We evaluated pain ratings throughout the conditions and assessed the virtual experience, finding that patients with chronic pain can achieve levels of ownership and agency over a virtual arm similar to healthy participants. All 7 conditions globally decreased pain ratings by half. Increasing transparency decreased pain in CRPS but did the opposite in PNI, whereas increasing size slightly increased pain ratings only in CRPS. We conclude that embodiment in VR can decrease pain ratings in chronic arm pain, although the type of pain determines which strategy to decrease pain is most useful. We discuss this through the interactions between body image and pain perception. Perspective: “Embodiment” in VR is useful to decrease pain ratings in chronic pain patients, but the best strategy needs to be tuned to the pain etiology. This approach could potentially help patients with chronic pain and clinicians who seek alternatives to pain management for patients.

Matamala-Gomez, M., Diaz Gonzalez, A., Slater, M., Sanchez-Vives, M. (2019). Decreasing Pain Ratings in Chronic Arm Pain Through Changing a Virtual Body: Different Strategies for Different Pain Types. THE JOURNAL OF PAIN, 20(6), 685-697 [10.1016/j.jpain.2018.12.001].

Decreasing Pain Ratings in Chronic Arm Pain Through Changing a Virtual Body: Different Strategies for Different Pain Types

Matamala-Gomez Marta.
Primo
;
2019

Abstract

Modifying the visual aspect of a virtual arm that is felt as one's own using immersive virtual reality (VR) modifies pain threshold in healthy subjects, but does it modify pain ratings in chronic pain patients? Our aim was to investigate whether varying properties of a virtual arm co-located with the real arm modulated pain ratings in patients with chronic arm/hand pain because of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type I (without nerve injury) or peripheral nerve injury (PNI). CRPS (n = 9) and PNI (n = 10) patients were immersed in VR and the virtual arm was shown at 4 transparency levels (transparency test) and 3 sizes (size test). We evaluated pain ratings throughout the conditions and assessed the virtual experience, finding that patients with chronic pain can achieve levels of ownership and agency over a virtual arm similar to healthy participants. All 7 conditions globally decreased pain ratings by half. Increasing transparency decreased pain in CRPS but did the opposite in PNI, whereas increasing size slightly increased pain ratings only in CRPS. We conclude that embodiment in VR can decrease pain ratings in chronic arm pain, although the type of pain determines which strategy to decrease pain is most useful. We discuss this through the interactions between body image and pain perception. Perspective: “Embodiment” in VR is useful to decrease pain ratings in chronic pain patients, but the best strategy needs to be tuned to the pain etiology. This approach could potentially help patients with chronic pain and clinicians who seek alternatives to pain management for patients.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
body ownership; chronic pain; complex regional pain syndrome; embodiment; virtual reality;
body ownership; chronic pain; complex regional pain syndrome; embodiment; virtual reality
English
685
697
13
Matamala-Gomez, M., Diaz Gonzalez, A., Slater, M., Sanchez-Vives, M. (2019). Decreasing Pain Ratings in Chronic Arm Pain Through Changing a Virtual Body: Different Strategies for Different Pain Types. THE JOURNAL OF PAIN, 20(6), 685-697 [10.1016/j.jpain.2018.12.001].
Matamala-Gomez, M; Diaz Gonzalez, A; Slater, M; Sanchez-Vives, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/275900
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