High-fidelity simulation (HFS) is a learning method which has proven effective in medical education for technical and non-technical skills. However, its effectiveness for knowledge acquisition is less validated. We performed a randomized study with the primary aim of investigating whether HFS, in association with frontal lessons, would improve knowledge about advanced life support (ALS), in comparison to frontal lessons only among medical students. The secondary aims were to evaluate the effect of HFS on knowledge acquisition of different sections of ALS and personal knowledge perception. Participants answered a pre-test questionnaire consisting of a subjective (evaluating personal perception of knowledge) and an objective section (measuring level of knowledge) containing 100 questions about algorithms, technical skills, team working/early warning scores/communication strategies according to ALS guidelines. All students participated in 3 frontal lessons before being randomized in group S, undergoing a HFS session, and group C, receiving no further interventions. After 10 days from the end of each intervention, both groups answered a questionnaire (post-test) with the same subjective section but a different objective one. The overall number of correct answers of the post-test was significantly higher in group S (mean 74.1, SD 11.2) than in group C (mean 65.5, SD 14.3), p = 0.0017, 95% C.I. 3.34 - 13.9. A significantly higher number of correct answers was reported in group S than in group C for questions investigating knowledge of algorithms (p = 0.0001; 95% C.I 2.22-5.99) and team working/early warning scores/communication strategies (p = 0.0060; 95% C.I 1.13-6.53). Students in group S showed a significantly higher score in the post-test subjective section (p = 0.0074). A lower proportion of students in group S confirmed their perception of knowledge compared to group C (p = 0.0079). HFS showed a beneficial effect on knowledge of ALS among medical students, especially for notions of algorithms and team working/early warning scores/communication.

Cortegiani, A., Russotto, V., Montalto, F., Iozzo, P., Palmeri, C., Raineri, S., et al. (2015). Effect of high-fidelity simulation on medical students' knowledge about advanced life support: A randomized study. PLOS ONE, 10(5) [10.1371/journal.pone.0125685].

Effect of high-fidelity simulation on medical students' knowledge about advanced life support: A randomized study

Russotto V.;
2015

Abstract

High-fidelity simulation (HFS) is a learning method which has proven effective in medical education for technical and non-technical skills. However, its effectiveness for knowledge acquisition is less validated. We performed a randomized study with the primary aim of investigating whether HFS, in association with frontal lessons, would improve knowledge about advanced life support (ALS), in comparison to frontal lessons only among medical students. The secondary aims were to evaluate the effect of HFS on knowledge acquisition of different sections of ALS and personal knowledge perception. Participants answered a pre-test questionnaire consisting of a subjective (evaluating personal perception of knowledge) and an objective section (measuring level of knowledge) containing 100 questions about algorithms, technical skills, team working/early warning scores/communication strategies according to ALS guidelines. All students participated in 3 frontal lessons before being randomized in group S, undergoing a HFS session, and group C, receiving no further interventions. After 10 days from the end of each intervention, both groups answered a questionnaire (post-test) with the same subjective section but a different objective one. The overall number of correct answers of the post-test was significantly higher in group S (mean 74.1, SD 11.2) than in group C (mean 65.5, SD 14.3), p = 0.0017, 95% C.I. 3.34 - 13.9. A significantly higher number of correct answers was reported in group S than in group C for questions investigating knowledge of algorithms (p = 0.0001; 95% C.I 2.22-5.99) and team working/early warning scores/communication strategies (p = 0.0060; 95% C.I 1.13-6.53). Students in group S showed a significantly higher score in the post-test subjective section (p = 0.0074). A lower proportion of students in group S confirmed their perception of knowledge compared to group C (p = 0.0079). HFS showed a beneficial effect on knowledge of ALS among medical students, especially for notions of algorithms and team working/early warning scores/communication.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Adult; Algorithms; Communication; Computer Simulation; Education, Medical; Female; Humans; Male; Manikins; Problem-Based Learning; Students, Medical; Surveys and Questionnaires
English
Cortegiani, A., Russotto, V., Montalto, F., Iozzo, P., Palmeri, C., Raineri, S., et al. (2015). Effect of high-fidelity simulation on medical students' knowledge about advanced life support: A randomized study. PLOS ONE, 10(5) [10.1371/journal.pone.0125685].
Cortegiani, A; Russotto, V; Montalto, F; Iozzo, P; Palmeri, C; Raineri, S; Giarratano, A
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/273178
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