BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders are highly prevalent among university students. In particular, the symptoms of sleep disorders are more prevalent among healthcare students. AIMS: To assess the prevalence of risk factors of insomnia and sleep disorders and to examine the correlations between them among nursing and medical students. We also compared the effects of shift work during internship. METHODS: The sample was 417 healthcare students; 202 of them were nursing students, and the remaining 215 were medical students. We used a self-administered questionnaire to assess the risk factors for insomnia (i.e. age, BMI, tobacco consumption, physical activity and perceived stress, using the General Health Questionnaire-12). We also used the Sleep and Daytime Habits Questionnaire and Epworth Sleepiness Scale to assess the prevalence of sleep disorders and daytime sleepiness. RESULTS: A higher percentage of nursing students than medical students were aged 25 years or older, engaged in inadequate levels of physical activity and consumed tobacco. With the exception of tobacco consumption among nursing students, high scores on the GHQ-12 were the only risk factor associated with daytime and nighttime symptoms and poor sleep quality. There was no significant association between the symptoms of sleep disorders and shift work including night shifts. CONCLUSIONS: Since sleep disorders are highly prevalent among healthcare students, early detection and management is recommended. This will decrease the risk of harm to students and patients, due to medical mistakes.

Belingheri, M., Pellegrini, A., Facchetti, R., De Vito, G., Cesana, G., Riva, M. (2020). Self-reported prevalence of sleep disorders among medical and nursing students. OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE, 70(2 (March 2020)), 127-130 [10.1093/occmed/kqaa011].

Self-reported prevalence of sleep disorders among medical and nursing students

Belingheri, M
Primo
;
Facchetti, R;De Vito, G;Cesana, G
Penultimo
;
Riva, M
Ultimo
2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders are highly prevalent among university students. In particular, the symptoms of sleep disorders are more prevalent among healthcare students. AIMS: To assess the prevalence of risk factors of insomnia and sleep disorders and to examine the correlations between them among nursing and medical students. We also compared the effects of shift work during internship. METHODS: The sample was 417 healthcare students; 202 of them were nursing students, and the remaining 215 were medical students. We used a self-administered questionnaire to assess the risk factors for insomnia (i.e. age, BMI, tobacco consumption, physical activity and perceived stress, using the General Health Questionnaire-12). We also used the Sleep and Daytime Habits Questionnaire and Epworth Sleepiness Scale to assess the prevalence of sleep disorders and daytime sleepiness. RESULTS: A higher percentage of nursing students than medical students were aged 25 years or older, engaged in inadequate levels of physical activity and consumed tobacco. With the exception of tobacco consumption among nursing students, high scores on the GHQ-12 were the only risk factor associated with daytime and nighttime symptoms and poor sleep quality. There was no significant association between the symptoms of sleep disorders and shift work including night shifts. CONCLUSIONS: Since sleep disorders are highly prevalent among healthcare students, early detection and management is recommended. This will decrease the risk of harm to students and patients, due to medical mistakes.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Insomnia; medical students; nursing students; sleep disorders
English
24-gen-2020
2020
70
2 (March 2020)
127
130
none
Belingheri, M., Pellegrini, A., Facchetti, R., De Vito, G., Cesana, G., Riva, M. (2020). Self-reported prevalence of sleep disorders among medical and nursing students. OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE, 70(2 (March 2020)), 127-130 [10.1093/occmed/kqaa011].
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/259117
Citazioni
  • Scopus 29
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 27
Social impact