Biomass burning is recognized as a main source of air pollutants. Combustion-derived particles (CDPs) have been linked to several respiratory diseases, including lung cancer. In the present study we investigated effects of CDPs originating from different sources on epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial step in the carcinogenic process. The aim of the study was to characterize and compare the relative role of the particle core versus extractable organic compounds. CDPs (PM10) were collected from a stove fueled with pellet, charcoal or wood, respectively, and chemically characterized. Human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC3-KT) were exposed to 2.5 μg/cm2 of whole PM, organic extracts and washed particles. The endpoints measured included cell viability, inflammatory responses, and cell migration. CDPs showed different chemical compositions: pellet PM was enriched in metals, while charcoal and wood ones have higher PAHs content. The results showed that CDPs differentially modulated cell viability and proliferation, and induced alterations in cell migration. Interestingly, our data revealed that the effects induced by the particles and by the adsorbed chemicals depended on the PM source; whereas exposure to washed pellet and wood PMs in general gave less response than whole particles and organic extracts, responses induced by washed charcoal were higher than from pristine particles. Additional studies on the expression of genes involved in these processes will provide additional information on the toxicological mechanisms. In conclusion, the present study suggests that specific components attached to the particles could be responsible for the diverse effects observed following exposure to pellet and wood PMs; whereas with regard to charcoal, the PM as such appeared more toxic. The study highlights the importance of studying CDPs from different biomass sources and that more targeted strategies should be implemented to reduce the biological impact caused by the emission of biomass-propelled heating systems and to prevent hazardous health effects. Acknowledgment This work was supported by Research Council of Norway, through the Better Health programs (grants n° 260381)

Marchetti, S., Holme, J., Mantecca, P., Colombo, A., Øvrevik, J., Mollerup, S. (2019). Toxicity of combustion-derived particles emitted from different biomass sources in human bronchial epithelial cells. Intervento presentato a: Congress of the European-Societies-of-Toxicology (EUROTOX) - Toxicology - Science Providing Solutions SEP 08-11, Helsinki, FINLAND.

Toxicity of combustion-derived particles emitted from different biomass sources in human bronchial epithelial cells

S. Marchetti
Primo
;
P. Mantecca;A. Colombo;
2019

Abstract

Biomass burning is recognized as a main source of air pollutants. Combustion-derived particles (CDPs) have been linked to several respiratory diseases, including lung cancer. In the present study we investigated effects of CDPs originating from different sources on epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial step in the carcinogenic process. The aim of the study was to characterize and compare the relative role of the particle core versus extractable organic compounds. CDPs (PM10) were collected from a stove fueled with pellet, charcoal or wood, respectively, and chemically characterized. Human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC3-KT) were exposed to 2.5 μg/cm2 of whole PM, organic extracts and washed particles. The endpoints measured included cell viability, inflammatory responses, and cell migration. CDPs showed different chemical compositions: pellet PM was enriched in metals, while charcoal and wood ones have higher PAHs content. The results showed that CDPs differentially modulated cell viability and proliferation, and induced alterations in cell migration. Interestingly, our data revealed that the effects induced by the particles and by the adsorbed chemicals depended on the PM source; whereas exposure to washed pellet and wood PMs in general gave less response than whole particles and organic extracts, responses induced by washed charcoal were higher than from pristine particles. Additional studies on the expression of genes involved in these processes will provide additional information on the toxicological mechanisms. In conclusion, the present study suggests that specific components attached to the particles could be responsible for the diverse effects observed following exposure to pellet and wood PMs; whereas with regard to charcoal, the PM as such appeared more toxic. The study highlights the importance of studying CDPs from different biomass sources and that more targeted strategies should be implemented to reduce the biological impact caused by the emission of biomass-propelled heating systems and to prevent hazardous health effects. Acknowledgment This work was supported by Research Council of Norway, through the Better Health programs (grants n° 260381)
Si
abstract + poster
biomass, EMT, lung toxicity
English
Congress of the European-Societies-of-Toxicology (EUROTOX) - Toxicology - Science Providing Solutions SEP 08-11
Marchetti, S., Holme, J., Mantecca, P., Colombo, A., Øvrevik, J., Mollerup, S. (2019). Toxicity of combustion-derived particles emitted from different biomass sources in human bronchial epithelial cells. Intervento presentato a: Congress of the European-Societies-of-Toxicology (EUROTOX) - Toxicology - Science Providing Solutions SEP 08-11, Helsinki, FINLAND.
Marchetti, S; Holme, J; Mantecca, P; Colombo, A; Øvrevik, J; Mollerup, S
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/244666
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