Objective: To explore midwives’ experiences of the management of the second stage of labour in women with epidural analgesia. Design: Descriptive qualitative study using semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Participants: Purposive sample of twelve midwives working in three Obstetric Units. Among them six were senior midwives with more than five years’ experience on labour ward and six were junior midwives with less than five years’ experience on labour ward. Findings: The findings included four themes: a) timing of second stage of labour and maternal pushing; b) maternal positions and mobility; c) perspectives on epidural boluses; d) midwifery presence and support. The time ‘allowed’ by midwives for the passive phase of the second stage of labour ranged from zero to two hours, with some of them avoiding vaginal examinations to delay the recorded starting time of active pushing. The semi-sitting and the lithotomy positions were the most used respectively in labour and at birth. Some midwives encouraged the kneeling position or the lateral position. Regarding the management of the epidural bolus during the second stage of labour, the interviewees’ opinions were divided between favourable and unfavourable to the administration of analgesic boluses after the full cervical dilatation. Midwives reported their experiences of providing different care to women with epidural analgesia when compared to women without epidural, mainly due to a more medicalised approach and the midwives’ sense of ‘usefulness’ when caring for women not experiencing labour pain. Conclusions and implications for practice: To our knowledge, this was the first study on this topic conducted in an Italian setting. Despite the consistent body of evidence on the effects of epidural analgesia in the second stage on birth outcomes, the lack of clear guidelines, the presence of different hospital protocols and Obstetricians’ opinion, introduce uncertainty in midwifery practice and lead midwives with feelings of ‘uselessness’. Across the four themes, midwives frequently had to negotiate a space for their professional autonomy with other healthcare professionals, whilst adhering to the Obstetric Units’ protocols. An influencing factor on the care provided to women with epidural was the years of midwife’s experience on labour ward. Further research and the development of comprehensive midwifery care guidelines on the management of the second stage of labour in women with an epidural analgesia appears essential.

Colciago, E., Fumagalli, S., Inzis, I., Borrelli E., S., Nespoli, A. (2019). Management of the second stage of labour in women with epidural analgesia: A qualitative study exploring Midwives’experiences in Northern Italy. MIDWIFERY, 78(Jul 15), 8-15 [10.1016/j.midw.2019.07.013].

Management of the second stage of labour in women with epidural analgesia: A qualitative study exploring Midwives’experiences in Northern Italy

Colciago Elisabetta
Primo
;
Fumagalli Simona
Secondo
;
Nespoli Antonella
Ultimo
2019

Abstract

Objective: To explore midwives’ experiences of the management of the second stage of labour in women with epidural analgesia. Design: Descriptive qualitative study using semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Participants: Purposive sample of twelve midwives working in three Obstetric Units. Among them six were senior midwives with more than five years’ experience on labour ward and six were junior midwives with less than five years’ experience on labour ward. Findings: The findings included four themes: a) timing of second stage of labour and maternal pushing; b) maternal positions and mobility; c) perspectives on epidural boluses; d) midwifery presence and support. The time ‘allowed’ by midwives for the passive phase of the second stage of labour ranged from zero to two hours, with some of them avoiding vaginal examinations to delay the recorded starting time of active pushing. The semi-sitting and the lithotomy positions were the most used respectively in labour and at birth. Some midwives encouraged the kneeling position or the lateral position. Regarding the management of the epidural bolus during the second stage of labour, the interviewees’ opinions were divided between favourable and unfavourable to the administration of analgesic boluses after the full cervical dilatation. Midwives reported their experiences of providing different care to women with epidural analgesia when compared to women without epidural, mainly due to a more medicalised approach and the midwives’ sense of ‘usefulness’ when caring for women not experiencing labour pain. Conclusions and implications for practice: To our knowledge, this was the first study on this topic conducted in an Italian setting. Despite the consistent body of evidence on the effects of epidural analgesia in the second stage on birth outcomes, the lack of clear guidelines, the presence of different hospital protocols and Obstetricians’ opinion, introduce uncertainty in midwifery practice and lead midwives with feelings of ‘uselessness’. Across the four themes, midwives frequently had to negotiate a space for their professional autonomy with other healthcare professionals, whilst adhering to the Obstetric Units’ protocols. An influencing factor on the care provided to women with epidural was the years of midwife’s experience on labour ward. Further research and the development of comprehensive midwifery care guidelines on the management of the second stage of labour in women with an epidural analgesia appears essential.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Midwives, Experience Midwifery practice, Second stage of labour, Epidural analgesia, Regional anesthesia
English
8
15
8
[Epub ahead of print]
Colciago, E., Fumagalli, S., Inzis, I., Borrelli E., S., Nespoli, A. (2019). Management of the second stage of labour in women with epidural analgesia: A qualitative study exploring Midwives’experiences in Northern Italy. MIDWIFERY, 78(Jul 15), 8-15 [10.1016/j.midw.2019.07.013].
Colciago, E; Fumagalli, S; Inzis, I; Borrelli E., S; Nespoli, A
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/236536
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