The physiological relevance of slow-wave vasomotion is still unclear, even though it has been hypothesized that it could be a compensatory mechanism for enhancing tissue oxygenation in conditions of reduced oxygen supply. The aim of our study was to explore the effects of hypoxia and ischemia on slow-wave vasomotion in microcirculation. Peripheral oxygen saturation and forearm microcirculation flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) were recorded at baseline and during postocclusive reactive hyperemia in the Himalaya region from 8 European lowlanders (6 men; aged 29-39 yr) at 1,350, 3,400, and 5,050 m and from 10 Nepalese male highlanders (aged 21-39 yr) at 3,400 and 5,050 m of altitude. The same measurements were also performed at sea level in 16 healthy volunteers (aged 23-61 yr) during a short-term exposure to normobaric hypoxia. In lowlanders, exposure to progressively higher altitude under baseline flow conditions progressively increased 0.06- 0.15 Hz vasomotion amplitude [power spectral density % was expressed as geometric means (geometric standard deviation) = 14.0 (3.6) at 1,350 m; 87.0(2.3) at 3,400 m and 249.8 (3.6) at 5,050 m; P = 0.006 and P < 0.001 vs. 1,350 m, respectively]. In highlanders, low frequency vasomotion amplitude was similarly enhanced at different altitudes [power spectral density % = 183.4 (4.1) at 3,400 m vs. 236.0 (3.0) at 5,050 m; P = 0.139]. In both groups at altitude, it was further increased after ischemic stimulus (P < 0.001). At baseline, acute short lasting normobaric hypoxia did not induce low frequency vasomotion, which was conversely induced by ischemia, even under normal oxygenation and barometric pressure. This study offers the demonstration of a significant increase in slow-wave vasomotion under prolonged hypobaric-hypoxia exposure at high altitude, with a further enhancement after ischemia induction.

Salvi, P., Faini, A., Castiglioni, P., Brunacci, F., Montaguti, L., Severi, F., et al. (2018). Increase in slow-wave vasomotion by hypoxia and ischemia in lowlanders and highlanders. JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY, 125(3), 780-789 [10.1152/japplphysiol.00977.2017].

Increase in slow-wave vasomotion by hypoxia and ischemia in lowlanders and highlanders

Salvi, Paolo
;
Faini, Andrea;Parati, Gianfranco
2018

Abstract

The physiological relevance of slow-wave vasomotion is still unclear, even though it has been hypothesized that it could be a compensatory mechanism for enhancing tissue oxygenation in conditions of reduced oxygen supply. The aim of our study was to explore the effects of hypoxia and ischemia on slow-wave vasomotion in microcirculation. Peripheral oxygen saturation and forearm microcirculation flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) were recorded at baseline and during postocclusive reactive hyperemia in the Himalaya region from 8 European lowlanders (6 men; aged 29-39 yr) at 1,350, 3,400, and 5,050 m and from 10 Nepalese male highlanders (aged 21-39 yr) at 3,400 and 5,050 m of altitude. The same measurements were also performed at sea level in 16 healthy volunteers (aged 23-61 yr) during a short-term exposure to normobaric hypoxia. In lowlanders, exposure to progressively higher altitude under baseline flow conditions progressively increased 0.06- 0.15 Hz vasomotion amplitude [power spectral density % was expressed as geometric means (geometric standard deviation) = 14.0 (3.6) at 1,350 m; 87.0(2.3) at 3,400 m and 249.8 (3.6) at 5,050 m; P = 0.006 and P < 0.001 vs. 1,350 m, respectively]. In highlanders, low frequency vasomotion amplitude was similarly enhanced at different altitudes [power spectral density % = 183.4 (4.1) at 3,400 m vs. 236.0 (3.0) at 5,050 m; P = 0.139]. In both groups at altitude, it was further increased after ischemic stimulus (P < 0.001). At baseline, acute short lasting normobaric hypoxia did not induce low frequency vasomotion, which was conversely induced by ischemia, even under normal oxygenation and barometric pressure. This study offers the demonstration of a significant increase in slow-wave vasomotion under prolonged hypobaric-hypoxia exposure at high altitude, with a further enhancement after ischemia induction.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Altitude; Hypoxia; Laser-Doppler flowmetry; Microcirculation; Vasomotion; Physiology; Physiology (medical)
English
780
789
10
Salvi, P., Faini, A., Castiglioni, P., Brunacci, F., Montaguti, L., Severi, F., et al. (2018). Increase in slow-wave vasomotion by hypoxia and ischemia in lowlanders and highlanders. JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY, 125(3), 780-789 [10.1152/japplphysiol.00977.2017].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/216977
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