Objective: Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) may represent a valid therapeutic option allowing several advantages for patients affected by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) awaiting orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). However, some reports in the literature have demonstrated worse long-term and disease-free survivals among patients treated by LDLT than deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) for HCC. Herein we have reported our long-term results comparing LDLT with DDLT for HCC. Patients and Methods: Among 179 patients who underwent OLT from January 2000 to December 2007, 25 (13.9%) received LDLT with HCC 154 (86.1%) received DDLT. Patients were selected based on the Milan criteria. Transarterial chemoembolization, radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous alcoholization, or liver resection was applied as a downstaging procedure while on the waiting list. Patients with stage II HCC were proposed for LDLT. Results: The overall 3- and 5-year survival rates were 77.3% and 68.7% versus 82.8% and 76.7% for LDLT and DDLT recipients, respectively, with no significant difference by the log-rank test. Moreover, the 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival rates were 95.5% and 95.5% (LDLT) versus 90.5% and 89.4% (DDLT; P = NS). Conclusions: LDLT guarantees the same long-term results as DDLT where there are analogous selection criteria for candidates. The Milan criteria remain a valid tool to select candidates for LDLT to achieve optimal long-term results. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

Di Sandro, S., Slim, A., Giacomoni, A., Lauterio, A., Mangoni, I., Aseni, P., et al. (2009). Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Long-Term Results Compared With Deceased Donor Liver Transplantation. TRANSPLANTATION PROCEEDINGS, 41(4), 1283-1285 [10.1016/j.transproceed.2009.03.022].

Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Long-Term Results Compared With Deceased Donor Liver Transplantation

Lauterio, A.;De Carlis, L.
2009

Abstract

Objective: Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) may represent a valid therapeutic option allowing several advantages for patients affected by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) awaiting orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). However, some reports in the literature have demonstrated worse long-term and disease-free survivals among patients treated by LDLT than deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) for HCC. Herein we have reported our long-term results comparing LDLT with DDLT for HCC. Patients and Methods: Among 179 patients who underwent OLT from January 2000 to December 2007, 25 (13.9%) received LDLT with HCC 154 (86.1%) received DDLT. Patients were selected based on the Milan criteria. Transarterial chemoembolization, radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous alcoholization, or liver resection was applied as a downstaging procedure while on the waiting list. Patients with stage II HCC were proposed for LDLT. Results: The overall 3- and 5-year survival rates were 77.3% and 68.7% versus 82.8% and 76.7% for LDLT and DDLT recipients, respectively, with no significant difference by the log-rank test. Moreover, the 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival rates were 95.5% and 95.5% (LDLT) versus 90.5% and 89.4% (DDLT; P = NS). Conclusions: LDLT guarantees the same long-term results as DDLT where there are analogous selection criteria for candidates. The Milan criteria remain a valid tool to select candidates for LDLT to achieve optimal long-term results. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular; Humans; Liver Neoplasms; Survival Rate; Cadaver; Liver Transplantation; Living Donors; Surgery; Transplantation; Medicine (all);
English
2009
41
4
1283
1285
none
Di Sandro, S., Slim, A., Giacomoni, A., Lauterio, A., Mangoni, I., Aseni, P., et al. (2009). Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Long-Term Results Compared With Deceased Donor Liver Transplantation. TRANSPLANTATION PROCEEDINGS, 41(4), 1283-1285 [10.1016/j.transproceed.2009.03.022].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/203846
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