Over the past 60 years there has been a dramatic increase in the prevalence of overweight in children and adolescents, ranging from 4% in 1975 to 18% in 2016. Recent estimates indicate that overweight or obese children and adolescents are more than 340 million. Obesity is often associated with hypertension, which is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Recent studies show that the presence of hypertension is a frequent finding in the pediatric age. Hypertensive children easily become hypertensive adults. This phenomenon contributes to increasing cardiovascular risk in adulthood. Primary hypertension is a growing problem especially in children and adolescents of western countries, largely because of its association with the ongoing obesity epidemic. Recently, it has been hypothesized that a dietary link between obesity and elevated blood pressure (BP) values could be simple carbohydrate consumption, particularly fructose, both in adults and in children. Excessive intake of fructose leads to increased serum uric acid (SUA) and high SUA values are independently associated with the presence of hypertension and weaken the efficacy of lifestyle modifications in children. The present review intends to provide an update of existing data regarding the relationship between BP, simple carbohydrates (particularly fructose), and uric acid in pediatric age. In addition, we analyze the national policies that have been carried out over the last few years, in order to identify the best practices to limit the socio-economic impact of the effects of excessive sugar consumption in children

Orlando, A., Cazzaniga, E., Giussani, M., Palestini, P., Genovesi, S. (2018). Hypertension in children: role of obesity, simple carbohydrates and uric acid. FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH, 6 [10.3389/fpubh.2018.00129].

Hypertension in children: role of obesity, simple carbohydrates and uric acid

Orlando, A
;
Cazzaniga, E;Giussani, M;Palestini, P;Genovesi, S
2018

Abstract

Over the past 60 years there has been a dramatic increase in the prevalence of overweight in children and adolescents, ranging from 4% in 1975 to 18% in 2016. Recent estimates indicate that overweight or obese children and adolescents are more than 340 million. Obesity is often associated with hypertension, which is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Recent studies show that the presence of hypertension is a frequent finding in the pediatric age. Hypertensive children easily become hypertensive adults. This phenomenon contributes to increasing cardiovascular risk in adulthood. Primary hypertension is a growing problem especially in children and adolescents of western countries, largely because of its association with the ongoing obesity epidemic. Recently, it has been hypothesized that a dietary link between obesity and elevated blood pressure (BP) values could be simple carbohydrate consumption, particularly fructose, both in adults and in children. Excessive intake of fructose leads to increased serum uric acid (SUA) and high SUA values are independently associated with the presence of hypertension and weaken the efficacy of lifestyle modifications in children. The present review intends to provide an update of existing data regarding the relationship between BP, simple carbohydrates (particularly fructose), and uric acid in pediatric age. In addition, we analyze the national policies that have been carried out over the last few years, in order to identify the best practices to limit the socio-economic impact of the effects of excessive sugar consumption in children
Articolo in rivista - Review Essay
obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, fructose, uric acid
English
2018
6
129
open
Orlando, A., Cazzaniga, E., Giussani, M., Palestini, P., Genovesi, S. (2018). Hypertension in children: role of obesity, simple carbohydrates and uric acid. FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH, 6 [10.3389/fpubh.2018.00129].
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
78 Frontiers Ac Urico 2018.pdf

accesso aperto

Dimensione 441.1 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
441.1 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/197418
Citazioni
  • Scopus 39
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 37
Social impact